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2017
January, 2017
  • Wednesday, January 04, 2017 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Senior Scientist - Human Nutrition position  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 05, 2017 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Senior Scientist - Human Nutrition position  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, January 09, 2017 - Wednesday, January 11, 2017
    Newton Fund Sustainable Rice Research - Grant-holders' Kick-off Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CURE/Climate Change Workshop on “Climate Change Adaptation in Fragile Rice Ecosystems”  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, January 11, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CURE/Climate Change Workshop on “Climate Change Adaptation in Fragile Rice Ecosystems”  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 12, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CURE/Climate Change Workshop on “Climate Change Adaptation in Fragile Rice Ecosystems”  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 19, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar “The Agricultural Technology Adoption Puzzle: What Can We Learn from Field Experiments?”
    by Alain de Janvry, Professor, University of California at Berkeley, U.S.A.
    Kyle Emerick,
    Elisabeth Sadoulet, and
    Manzoor Dar

    Abstract:
    The Green Revolution, consisting of using high-yielding variety (HYV) seeds together with high fertilizer doses, has been widely adopted under irrigated conditions, but is generally less so in rainfed areas that are prone to stress such as drought and flooding. This puzzling lag in technology adoption is holding back the role of agriculture for development in extensive regions of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa and Eastern India, with high aggregate costs in terms of economic growth and human welfare. Field experiments have been particularly useful in addressing this adoption puzzle. Significant lessons have been learned on the roles of farmer behavior and of mediating factors such as credit, insurance, markets, and policies in constraining adoption. We use experimental field research in Eastern India to show that rainfed agriculture typically suffers from the lack of effective supply of suitable HYVs, constraining adoption and resulting in low fertilizer use. Effective supply requires the existence of suitable HYVs (provided by research), the provision of information to farmers about these technologies (provided by extension services and social networks), and their local availability for adoption (provided by private agents in value chains). We consequently argue that solving the adoption puzzle for rainfed areas requires that governments and international donors increase investment in discovery-type agricultural research, support innovations in extension services, and promote the role of private agents in value chains. For donors, this implies resolving a collective action problem in the provision of international public goods, which remains pervasive. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, January 23, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Special Seminar: PB Plant Lipids - Roles in Plants, as Renewable Fats and in Health

    Prof. John L. Harwood
    Cardiff School of Biosciences
    Cardiff University :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 26, 2017 03:00pm - 04:30pm
    IRRI Joint OHS Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 26, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Social Hour  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 27, 2017 08:30am - 10:30am
    Azolla Meeting c/o Y. Kato  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 27, 2017 05:00pm - 09:00pm
    India Republic Day celebration  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, January 30, 2017 10:30am - 11:30am
    CESD Special Division Seminar CESD Special Division Seminar

    Date: 30 January 2017, Monday: 10:30-11:30 AM
    Venue: CESD Conference Room 1, DL Umali Bldg.

    Title: The Rapid Phenotyping Platform: High-throughput chemical phenotyping of rice

    Speaker:
    William M. Palmer
    Rapid Phenotyping Pty. Ltd.

    Abstract:
    Rapid Phenotyping Pty. Ltd. have released a novel phenotyping platform that streamlines the process of harvesting, grinding and chemically phenotyping rice grains and stems. The platform includes trackable containers to eliminate double handling of samples, a high-throughput mechanical grinder capable of grinding thousands of samples per day without the requirement for labour, and sophisticated spectral-based machine learning algorithms calibrated for numerous chemical variables (i.e. starch, sugars, carbohydrates etc.). These results are immediately delivered to users through a simple web-based user interface that can be operated with minimal to no training. Once spectral data has been collected in this way, the data can be mined retrospectively for any new chemical variable of interest.

    In only 2 weeks here at IRRI 6,000 rice grain and stem samples have been dried, ground and chemically phenotyped for 8 and 11 chemical traits respectively! So, please join us on Monday to find out how this was achieved and how it can benefit your research, breeding, and knowledge.

     :: IRRI Events

February, 2017
  • Wednesday, February 01, 2017 08:00am - 12:00pm
    RMQA Security summit  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 06, 2017 - Wednesday, February 08, 2017
    Wageningen University-RICE CRP Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 06, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB &GB Special Division Joint Seminar by Mr. Yusuke Kurokawa, PhD Candidate from Nagoya University, Japan PB and GB Special Division Joint Seminar

    Title: Leaf Gas Film1 (LGF1) maintained hydrophobicity of leaves essential for underwater gas exchange

    Mr. Yusuke Kurokawa
    PhD Candidate
    Nagoya University, Japan :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 08, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    Experience IFSA (Orientation 2017)  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 09, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar February 9, 2017
    1:15-2:15pm
    Havener Auditorium
    IRRI

    "Leap Forward: A Communication Framework for IRRI's Next Horizon"
    by Temina Lalani-Sharif
    Head, Communication

    Abstract:
    Can communication help an organization further its mission?
    Stories have to be compelling to generate interest and inspire change. At IRRI, sharing our story effectively with donors, partners, and the public has the potential to raise our profile and attract investment. Done well, communication can further IRRI's mission by helping people understand the work we do and the impact we have.
    Please join us to learn about the IRRI Communication Strategy that was recently approved by the Board of Trustees. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, February 10, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    PICPA Regional Accounting Quiz Bowl  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 13, 2017 - Friday, February 17, 2017
    IRRI Science Week  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 13, 2017 - Friday, February 17, 2017
    IRRI Science Week  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 16, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar February 16, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm
    Havener Auditorium
    IRRI

    "The contribution of IRRI germplasm to rice Improvement and yield growth in India". Authors: Aldas Janaiah, (Consultant, Social Science Division, IRRI, India Office), Prakashan Chellattan Veettil, Ekta Joshi and Samarendu Mohanty

    Abstract:
    The principal objective of the study is to compute and analyze the contribution of IRRI germplasm to India’s rice improvement program and its effect on yield growth over the past 50 years (1966–2015). The term “rice improvement” in this study is confined to varietal development programs with respect to (a) the number of high-yielding varieties (HYVs) released for the farmers, and (b) improvement of varietal traits (maturity period, grain quality, and resistance to insect pests and diseases). Time-series data on different outcome-indicators of the rice improvement program and other time-series data (1966 to 2015) were compiled from various reports of the All-India Coordinated Rice Improvement Project (AICRIP) from and from various sources of the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare of the government of India. A genetic improvement index is constructed for each HYV with digressive proportionate scores for each parent at each generation (up to F5). The share of germplasm of IRRI and NARES is computed based on the source of germplasm at each stage.

    Key findings
    About 50% of the total 1,066 HYVs released in India over the past 50 years have IRRI germplasm. Among them, 155 HYVs were developed based on IR8 alone. Nearly two-thirds of IRRI-germplasm HYVs have resistance to insect pests and diseases. Three-fourths of the total IRRI-germplasm based HYVs are either short- or medium-duration HYVs. The overall contribution of IRRI’s germplasm to the varietal development program in India over the past years is estimated at 25.4%, including about 3.2% by IR8. Furthermore, IRRI’s germplasm has about a 51% share in IRRI germplasm-based HYVs released during 1966-2015.

    Average rice area planted to IRRI germplasm-based HYVs over the past 50 years is 8.2 million ha per year, which is about 20% of India’s total rice area. Net share of IRRI’s germplasm in total rice area is estimated at about 10% of the total rice area every year during this period. Additional average annual rice production due to widespread adoption of IRRI germplasm-based HYVs is about 18 million tons, of which 50% is accounted for by IRRI germplasm over the past 50 years. In financial terms, at about an average price of USD 200 per ton of paddy, nearly USD 2.4 billion per year of financial benefits have been generated by IRRI germplasm-based HYVs and USD 1.2 billion USD by by IRRI’s germplasm from 1966 to 2015.

    Nearly 18% of overall yield growth in India over the past 50 years was contributed by IRRI germplasm-based HYVs, of which about half is exclusively accounted for by IRRI germplasm alone :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 20, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Leadership Intensive course  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 20, 2017 08:30am - 12:00pm
    Candidate Seminar: Head - PCDR Date: 20 Feb 2017 (Monday)
    Time: 8:30 - 12:30
    Title: "What are the keys to success for efficient project coordination and grants management? How would you implement it?" :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 21, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Leadership Intensive course  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 21, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CORIGAP Start Up Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 21, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    HRS Birches Training  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 22, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Mentoring Mid-Cycle Review  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 22, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CORIGAP Start Up Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 22, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    HRS Birches Training  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 22, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB Division Seminar  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 23, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CORIGAP Start Up Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 23, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    HRS Birches Training  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 23, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar February 23, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium
    IRRI

    "Designer plant oils through metabolic engineering"
    Author: Surinder Singh
    Senior Principal Scientist, Group Leader, Plant Oil Engineering, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Canberra, Australia

    Abstract:
    Plant oils are an important source of dietary fat and represent as much as 25% of human caloric intake in developed countries. The current annual world production of plant oils is about 130 million tonnes, with a value of more than USD 65 billion, of which 86% is used for human consumption and the rest utilised in industrial applications.
    Fatty acids are the major constituents of plant oils and represent an impressive renewable resource of calories and nutrients. Naturally, there is an enormous diversity of fatty acids; however, current commercial plant oils are comprised of relatively few fatty acids. A combination of the ability to genetically engineer most commercial oilseed species and an explosion in the knowledge of genes controlling the synthesis of fatty acids enables the application of metabolic engineering for the production of plant oils with enhanced nutritional properties.
    In this seminar, I will discuss strategies being employed in the Plant Oils Engineering Group at CSIRO for the development of nutritionally and industrially improved plant oils. These include the use of RNAi gene silencing for the creation of a highly monounsaturated form of oil for food and oleochemical applications. I will also discuss the production of omega-3 long-chain (≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 LC-PUFA), such as EPA and DHA, which have critical roles in human health and development. Numerous studies indicate that deficiencies in these fatty acids can increase the risk or severity, particularly, of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. In order to meet the increasing demand for these oils, there is an urgent need for an alternative, safe, and sustainable source of EPA and DHA. My talk will describe the transition of DHA production in seed of our model species Arabidopsis, through to Camelina and our target crop, canola. DHA levels that exceed the amount typically found in bulk fish oil have now been achieved in all three species and involved the transfer of a 7-gene algal pathway into oilseed crops. Finally, I will talk about the engineering of seed oil-like levels in leaves of plants. This approach has the potential to revolutionise the way plant oils are produced, with palm oil-like productivity achievable in high-biomass C4 crops such as sorghum and miscanthus. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 23, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Social Hour  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, February 24, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CORIGAP Start Up Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, February 24, 2017 10:00am - 12:00pm
    Presentation to Division Heads/Senior Scientists re: Budget Management and Reporting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 28, 2017 - Thursday, March 02, 2017
    RIICE Steering Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 28, 2017 03:00pm - 05:00pm
    IFSA General Assembly  :: IRRI Events

March, 2017
  • Thursday, March 02, 2017 - Friday, March 03, 2017
    International Conference on Food and Agriculture  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 03, 2017 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    ECDC General Assembly  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 06, 2017 - Friday, March 10, 2017
    2017 RICE Planning, PPMT, and Independent Steering Committee Meetings  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 06, 2017 - Friday, March 10, 2017
    Basic Experimental Design and Data Analysis  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 08, 2017 09:00am - 10:00am
    Azolla IRRI-UPLB LOA signing  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 08, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
    International Women's Day Celebration  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 09, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar March 9, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium, IRRI

    "Gender Research in the Rice Sector of Latin America"
    Author: Jennifer Twyman, Gender Research Leader, CIAT

    Abstract:
    This presentation will give an overview of the gender research that has been conducted in Latin America by CIAT gender researchers in the last 3 years. Much of the research focuses on documenting women's contributions to rice production and how gender norms limit our recognition of women's contributions. Three broad areas of women's participation are considered: decision-making, labor, and control of resources/assets. Other research explores how women's participation in decision-making is related to the adoption of modern rice varieties (Ecuador); examines indicators of women's empowerment in the rice sector (Bolivia); and investigates men's and women's preferences for water management practices such as alternate wetting and drying (AWD, Colombia). After describing these examples, the presentation will conclude with a discussion of next steps and what else we need to know about gender in the rice sector of Latin America. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 13, 2017 08:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Sr. Scientist - Plant Breeding position The title of the seminar is "Variety Development and Mega-Variety Replacement Strategies in South Asia" :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - Thursday, March 16, 2017
    Rothamsted Research Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 14, 2017 - Friday, March 17, 2017
    Meeting: Special Committee on the IRRI Strategic Plan with IRRI Board of Trustees  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 14, 2017
    Inception meeting and Andhra Pradesh Project Kick-off  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 14, 2017 09:30am - 11:00am
    Travel Tracker training by ISOS - via Webex c/o ISOS
    - list of participants and corresponding invites to follow :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 14, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Special Seminar ​Rothamsted Research's Science Strategy for 2017-2022
    Achim Dobermann,
    DIrector & Chief Executive, Rothamsted Research

    Founded in 1843, Rothamsted Research is the oldest agricultural research center in the world. Through independent, excellent science and innovation Rothamsted makes significant contributions to improving agri-food systems in the UK and internationally. The institute has recently gone through a strategic planning process to position itself for the future. Dr. Dobermann will present the future vision and strategy for Rothamsted's science and discuss opportunities for international collaboration. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 15, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    CESD Seminar CESD Seminar

    (Please mark your calendar, click “Add to calendar”. We make only one announcement per seminar and will not circulate reminders.)

    Date: 15 March 2017, Wednesday: 1:15-2:15pm
    Venue: CESD Conference Room 1, DL Umali Bldg.

    Title: High fidelity phenotyping of productivity, WUE and drought traits in the model C4 grasses maize, sorghum and setaria

    Speaker:
    Andrew D.B. Leakey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Abstract:
    The ability to cheaply and quickly phenotype large mapping populations of C4 grass crops for complex traits related to productivity and drought tolerance severely limits efforts to understand genotype-to-phenotype associations under field conditions. Here we report the development and application of methods to assess: (1) above-ground biomass production from hemispherical imaging; (2) stomatal patterning from optical tomography; (3) leaf nitrogen status and allometry from hyperspectral reflectance; (4) drought-induced leaf curling from hemispherical imaging; and (5) canopy temperature by infra-red imaging as a proxy for crop water use. We demonstrate that these methods successfully capture the same genotype by environment interactions and reproduce quantitative trait loci analyses as traditional methods that are slower and more expensive. The combination of these advances in phenotyping capability and new knowledge of the genetic architecture of productivity and drought traits creates a research platform that can now be applied to biosystems design of more productive and ecologically sustainable biofuel and bioproduct crops. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 16, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 17, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB & GB Division Seminar  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - Thursday, March 23, 2017
    Global Crop Diversity Trust Board Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - Friday, March 24, 2017
    Global Crop Diversity Trust MT Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 21, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    CESD Seminar @ Tue Mar 21, 2017 1:15pm - 2:15pm CESD Seminar
    (Please mark your calendar, click “Add to calendar”. We make only one announcement per seminar and will not circulate reminders.)

    Date: 21 March 2017, Tuesday: 1:15-2:15pm
    Venue: CESD Conference Rm 1, DL Umali Bldg.

    Title: Exploring the rational adaptation of rice systems to climate variability at farm level in Africa: a case study of rainfed rice in the bimodal area of Côte d'Ivoire.

    Speaker: Kouassi Amani
    PhD, Student, University NanguiAbrogoua of Côte d'Ivoire
    Intern, Crop Modelling, CESD

    Abstract: In Côte d'Ivoire (West Africa), similarly to the other sub-Saharan African countries, the ongoing urbanization is driving some big changes in the diet of the population. Although yam, cassava, and plantain banana were the predominant traditional foods, rice has become the staple food for more than 90% of the population. Nevertheless, national rice production is much less than the demand, and the supply-demand gap is continuously filled by importations. Due to the heavy dependency on rice importation, the fluctuations of the international rice price, such as the peak of 2008, strongly impact the food security of Côte d'Ivoire. To stabilize the food security, many initiatives have been launched for increasing the national rice production, particularly the improvement of smallholders farming systems under rainfed conditions. Indeed, this study aimed to explore the rational adaptation of rainfed rice to the raging climate variability using crop modeling technology. The good sowing periods, suitable to increasing farmers' yields (which are less than 1.5t/ha) were determined. The climate yield ceilings were estimated. The uncertainties for impact assessment resulting from weather information of three Global Climate Models were also quantified. Moreover, the perspectives of bias correction were outlined.

    All are invited. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 22, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB and GB Divisions Seminar Title: Selecting crops with greater water productivity - integrating genetics and
    phenotyping in delivery of vigorous wheat breeding lines

    Abstract:
    Crops reliant on rainfall for growth commonly experience water deficit to reduce grain yield and quality. This challenge is acknowledged with breeders selecting for genotypic adaptation to water-limited environments. However, progress is slow, many factors contributing to slowing breeding progress in rainfed environments: (1) strict requirements for improved grain quality and disease resistance reduce genetic variance for performance under drought; (2) drought is a dynamic entity changing in timing and severity from one year/site to the next; and (3) both the above contributing to large genotype × environment interaction to reduce repeatability of genotype performance and confidence in selection. The opportunity exists to compliment existing selection for yield with novel trait variation to improve performance.

    Side-by-side comparisons of wheat with barley and triticale show wheat consistently produces smaller yields owing to its lower water-use efficiency. Barley and triticale produce greater leaf area and biomass early in the season to shade the soil surface, in turn, increasing transpiration efficiency and reducing water loss through soil evaporation. Wheat is inherently conservative in its early growth. Efforts to source global diversity for ‘early vigour’ alleles using S1 recurrent selection, and linked markers for new gibberellin-sensitive dwarfing genes has delivered elite germplasm with greater biomass and yield, and unexpected benefits in improved competitiveness with weeds and greater nutrient uptake. These lines are now being delivered for use in commercial breeding.


    Dr. Greg Rebetzke
    Group Leader - Southern Crops,
    Breeding High Value Food Crops,
    Agriculture and Food,
    Commonwealth Scientific and Research Organization
    (CSIRO) :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 23, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar "The History and Future of Grasses"
    Author: Peter Crane, President
    Oak Spring Garden Foundation

    Abstract:
    Over the past thirty years, the evolutionary history of flowering plants (angiosperms) has been brought into much sharper focus by substantially increased understanding of the angiosperm fossil record, as well as the widespread application of molecular phylogenetics to living plants. These advances have helped situate the evolution of grasses in the broader context of monocot evolution, and have illuminated patterns of ecological, phylogenetic, physiological, and temporal change within the grass family over the past 70 million years. At the same time, large-scale syntheses of bibliographic and herbarium data have provided more rigorous documentation of the dimensions of plant biodiversity, and the extent to which plants are under threat in the wild at a global scale—the most substantial single threat being habitat clearance and modification for agriculture. Thus, the overriding determinant of the future of plants will be the future of agriculture—how we use plants to feed the world. Nowhere is this seeming paradox more obvious than in the grasses, one of the most diverse and widely distributed of all plant families, but also the family on which a vast proportion of global agriculture depends. While only a few of the approx. 650 genera and approx. 11,000 grass species are used widely in agriculture, advances in molecular biology make it increasingly clear that it is a mistake to consider the “economically important” grasses in isolation, since their wild relatives are an important source of genetic diversity and since there is increasing evidence of widespread lateral gene transfer connected to the development of important traits (e.g., C4 photosynthesis) in grass evolution. A broader view, bringing together conservation biologists and agronomists, is therefore important to conserve the evolutionary potential and living variety of grasses as a whole through integrated in situ and ex situ approaches. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 23, 2017 07:00pm - 09:00pm
    Hail & Farewell Party  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 27, 2017 - Friday, March 31, 2017
    Workshop on Management of Bacterial Blight in Rice  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 27, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 27, 2017 01:00pm - 02:00pm
    Candidate Seminar: Sr. Dev't Specialist - Agri Extension and Technology Transfer  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - Wednesday, March 29, 2017
    Workshop on Opportunities for Diversification in Rice-based Systems Workshop on Opportunities for Diversification in Rice-based Systems
    RICE's Flagship Project 3 - Sustainable Farming Systems
    28 & 29 March 2017, Bangkok

    Background
    In RICE's flagship project 3 (sustainable farming systems) two focal areas for diversification of rice-based farming systems in Asia were identified: 1) the coastal zone, around the nexus water-rice-fish/shrimp farming, and 2) rice-fallow systems where pulses, beans, vegetables can be introduced/expanded. The second area is the focus of this workshop in Bangkok with ICARDA, ICRISAT, WorldVeg and NARES.

    Aim
    The broad aim of the workshop is 'Develop a framework for partnerships to optimize rice-pulses/vegetables systems in Asia', with the following as potential target regions: eastern India, Myanmar, southern Bangladesh, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia.
     :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017
    Roundtable Discussion on IRRI strategies for Bangladesh and South Asia  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017 11:00am - 01:00pm
    IRRI-UPLB Joint Management Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 29, 2017
    2nd PRISM Annual Executive Meeting We have 5 slots allotted to the EVEO and Comms Team who will help the PRISM team during the event. Please let us know who will attend so we can arrange your transportation. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 29, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 29, 2017 01:30pm - 03:00pm
    PB & GB Joint Division Seminar  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 30, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 30, 2017 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    4th Roundtable Discussion with Health and Nutrition Partners in the Philippines  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 30, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar "Benefiting rice farmers through improved crop management: Experiences in research and partnerships"
    Author: Roland J. Buresh
    Crop and Environmental Sciences Division
    IRRI

    Abstract:
    “What is the role of IRRI in the dissemination of crop and resource management technologies arising from research?” This was a passionately debated topic at IRRI when I arrived in early 2000. This question remains relevant today as supporters of IRRI increasingly expect accelerated impacts from IRRI’s research.
    One of my responsibilities at IRRI beginning in January 2000 was to help ensure that the excellent science and research on site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) led to benefits for rice farmers. This seminar will outline some insights, successes, and failures in the 17 years that followed. Two contrasting successes in the large-scale dissemination of crop management technologies in Asia for increased income and yield of rice farmers will be highlighted. One was in China through a blanket recommendation without the use of information and communications technology (ICT), and the other in the Philippines through field-specific recommendations using ICT tools.
    Success in accelerating dissemination started with a relatively easy-to-use technology, which increased farmers’ income and yield with acceptable risk. Strong underlying scientific principles helped tailor the technology to benefit a large number of farmers. Large-scale deployment of the technology required innovative partnerships and ‘processes’ of engagement and sustainability across research and extension. Four components along the research to dissemination continuum will be proposed as critical for success in reaching and benefiting many farmers with crop and resource management technologies. Personal observations will include the refining of research and partnerships for accelerated impact. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 30, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Social Hour  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 31, 2017
    Round Table discussion on IRRI strategy for Nepal and South Asia  :: IRRI Events

April, 2017
  • Tuesday, April 04, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Establishing Community-Based Seed Systems for Technical Services for Farmers of AFOSP-MTCP2 Philippines  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 04, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    CESD Seminar Dr. Yoichiro Kato
    Senior Scientist I
    Crop and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD)
    Date: 04 April 2017
    Time: 1:15-2:15pm
    Venue: CESD Conference Room 1, DL Umali Bldg.
    Title: IRRI's rainfed lowland agronomy research in Southest Asia for the last 3.7 years :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, April 05, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Establishing Community-Based Seed Systems for Technical Services for Farmers of AFOSP-MTCP2 Philippines  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 06, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Establishing Community-Based Seed Systems for Technical Services for Farmers of AFOSP-MTCP2 Philippines  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 06, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar April 6, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium
    IRRI


    "The Nitrogen Dilemma: Good and Bad"
    Author: J.K. Ladha
    Crop and Environmental Sciences Division
    IRRI

    Abstract:
    Nitrogen is unique among the major nutrients in that it originates from the atmosphere and its transformations and transport in ecosystems are mediated by the water cycle and biological processes. The atmosphere contains a large, well-mixed biologically unavailable pool of N, of which a small part is converted to biologically available reactive N. Biological N fixation is the primary source of reactive N but, in recent years, chemical N fixation has become important in increasing crop productivity to alleviate the ever-increasing food insecurity. Since the Green Revolution, the application of N fertilizers on “modern crop cultivars” of cereals has boosted food production by about 6.4% per year. Today, fertilizer N supplies 100 Tg year-1 for food production. Of this, 50% is applied to three major cereal crops—maize, rice, and wheat. It is projected that annual total global N use will be around 171 metric t in 2050, assuming that there is no change in nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE). Fertilizer N-recovery efficiency of cereals is 30% to 50%. Surplus N is lost to the environment, causing disruptions in ecosystem functions. Much research has been conducted in the past decades to improve NUE by developing fertilizer management strategies based on better synchronization of supply and crop demand. This presentation will analyze the (1) different sources of N inputs and outputs in global cereal production, (2) effect of long-term addition of synthetic N on soil N storage, (3) NUE of cereals grown across large agroclimatic regions, and (4) agronomic and genetic strategies available to improve NUE and reduce losses.  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, April 07, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Establishing Community-Based Seed Systems for Technical Services for Farmers of AFOSP-MTCP2 Philippines  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, April 07, 2017 09:00am - 03:00pm
    Golden Rice- Syngenta Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, April 07, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    CESD Seminar Improved weed management and crop establishment in direct-seeded systems using anaerobic germination-tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes



    B.S. Chamara
    Ph.D. Scholar, Weed Science
    Crop and Environmental Sciences Division


    Abstract:
    Improving rice production technologies through efficient resource use is critical in keeping the food supply sufficient to feed increasing populations and under a changing and variable climate. Direct-seeded rice (DSR) is one such strategy and has evolved as a feasible alternative to the conventional puddled transplanted rice. Two major constraints in DSR, however, are (A) poor and uneven crop establishment due to water logging/flooding soon after seeding, and (B) high weed infestation, both of which result in significant yield loss unless managed properly. Farmers have primarily used herbicides in DSR systems to improve the timeliness of weed control and to overcome labor bottlenecks. Although the use of herbicides greatly minimizes weed competition, it may not provide season-long weed control when applied alone. In addition, over-dependence on the use of herbicides poses both economic and environmental risks, including the evolution of herbicide resistance in weed species. Hence, integrated weed management becomes a key approach to sustainable weed control in DSR systems. Water management, on the other hand, is the most effective cultural weed management strategy in any weed control program. Flooding the field soon after direct seeding creates an anaerobic environment that helps to manage weeds effectively during the early stages of crop growth. However, flooding also reduces the germination of rice seeds, as modern rice genotypes are unable to withstand anaerobic conditions. The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) has thus developed anaerobic germination-tolerant (AG) rice genotypes, which may help in overcoming both issues of poor crop establishment and high weed infestations in DSR under flooded conditions. A series of studies was carried out on developing effective crop establishment and weed management techniques in wet- and dry-DSR systems involving AG genotypes, under screenhouse and field conditions. In this seminar, key findings including crop establishment and growth, weed control, weed population dynamic, associated problems in each system under anaerobic conditions, and successes and failures will be presented. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 17, 2017 - Thursday, April 20, 2017
    IRRI Board of Trustees Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 17, 2017 03:00pm - 05:00pm
    Launch of IRRI Education  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 24, 2017 - Saturday, April 29, 2017
    IRRI Sports Week  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 24, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
    MOA Signing with NIA  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 24, 2017 04:00pm - 06:00pm
    IRRI Sports Week Kick Off  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 24, 2017 04:00pm - 05:00pm
    PB & GB Divisions Seminar Title: Are consumers willing to accept GM biofortified rice?

    Abstract:
    Despite various promising efforts in research and development on GM biofortification, the use of biotechnology for developing micronutrient-rich crops is still plagued by controversy while facing various political and regulatory hurdles, which also impedes commercialization of Golden Rice as the first GM biofortified crop. Aside from these forces, the success of their future commercialization will crucially hinge on consumer acceptance. To effectively support regions where the need to enhance micronutrient intake levels through such GM crops is highest, consumers should first embrace these crops. Besides technical prerequisites, particularly the bioavailability and stability of the targeted vitamins or minerals, it is the consumer who will ultimately determine the magnitude of the reduction of micronutrient malnutrition through GM biofortification. This seminar will provide an in-depth examination of consumer studies dealing with GM biofortified crops, and willingness-to-pay, i.e. the premium consumers are prepared to pay for such GM crops, in particular. Thereby, specific attention will be devoted to the role of information, which is deemed crucial. The findings allow researchers to better anticipate potential methodological biases when examining willingness-to-pay, while it gives policy makers and other stakeholders a broad understanding of the potential demand for different biofortified crops in various settings. The findings demonstrate that biofortification by genetic engineering as a health policy intervention is well accepted by the majority of its key beneficiaries, with consumers’ premium levels generally above 20%. However, unlike conventional biofortification, negative GM information may have a devastating impact on future acceptance.


    Dr. Hans De Steur
    Div. Agri-food marketing & Chain Management
    ​Dept. Agricultural Economics
    ​Faculty of Bio-Science Engineering
    ​Ghent University :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - Friday, April 28, 2017
    CGIAR System Organization Open Access Working Group Annual Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2017 09:00am - 10:30am
    Candidate Seminar: Program Lead - Transgenic Technologies for Nutrition post under Integrative Impact position Title: Leading IRRI's deployment of Transgenic Crops
    Speaker: Dr. Leena Tripathi :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2017 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    CESD Special Division Seminar@ Tue Apr 25, 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm CESD Special Division Seminar
    (Please mark your calendar, click “Add to calendar”. We make only one announcement per seminar and will not circulate reminders.)

    Date: 25 April 2017, Tuesday: 3:00-4:00PM (not 1:15pm)
    Venue: CESD Conference Room 1, 1/F Umali Bldg.

    Title: Does your method give you quality data?
    Speaker: Ms. Lily R. Molina, Registered Chemist
    Laboratory and Quality Manager
    Grain Quality and Nutrition Services Laboratory
    PB - Grain Quality and Nutrition Center

    Abstract:
    There are many test methods used in the field and among IRRI laboratories to generate data needed for IRRI research work. Some of these methods were taken from standard methods, journal articles and some are in-house developed. The laboratories need to prove their competence that their methods are able to achieve quality data for their intended use. To help me prepare for this seminar, feedbacks from key laboratory staffs from PB and GB were gathered to ask them the same question as the title of this seminar and copies of their protocols were studied to better understand their existing methods.

    Based on the information gathered, selected methods commonly used at PB and GB laboratories will be used to demonstrate how the laboratory can prove its competence to generate quality data by performing method validation or verification fitted for its data requirements. Up to what extent of method validation will be applicable to IRRI laboratories will depend on the laboratory’s pursuit for scientific value, regulatory compliance or business value. Lack of method validation may generate inaccurate results that may impact IRRI’s business continuity, product quality, people’s health and safety or its compliance with regulatory authorities.

    All are cordially invited.  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, April 26, 2017 09:00am - 10:30am
    Candidate Seminar: Program Lead - Transgenic Technologies for Nutrition post under Integrative Impact position Title: Leading IRRI's deployment of Transgenic Crops
    Speaker: Dr. Don MacKenzie :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, April 26, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
    Special Seminar: Big Data Platform in the CGIAR Speaker: Medha Devare :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, April 26, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB & GB Joint Division Seminar PB and GB Joint Division Seminar
    (Please click “Add to calendar” to mark it in your calendar. We will not circulate reminders)

    Title: A rice multi-approach study to discover new loci associated with traits contributing to
    salinity stress under controlled and field conditions

    Abstract:
    Soil salinity is a major constraint to rice production worldwide. Thus, to feed 9 billion people by 2050, we need to increase rice production while facing the challenges of rapid global environmental changes. To meet some of these challenges, there is a vital requirement to significantly increase rice production in salinized land.
    Here we present a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with the aim to discover new genes associated with traits contributing to rice salinity tolerance under both controlled and field conditions. Our multi-approach study includes high-throughput phenotyping, field trials and dynamic QTL analysis. We used two diversity panels- indica and aus, which were established within the ‘Phenomics of Rice Adaptation and Yield Potential’ (PRAY) project. First, both panels were grown in controlled waterlogged conditions, and used to quantify the effects of salinity on growth and transpiration traits using high-throughput phenotyping. Second, the indica panel alone was cultivated under irrigated field conditions in Senegal, to investigate the effects of salinity stress on yield and yield components. The use of the same indica panel in both experiments may uncover new sources of salinity tolerance by discovering novel loci associated with growth, transpiration, and yield. Moreover, to clearly identify genes only responsive to salinity stress, we are using an association model- the interaction model- that takes into account the interaction between treatment (control and salt) and genetic marker. This model allowed the identification of loci affecting transpiration use efficiency on chromosome 11, in the indica panel, and associated with the early responses of rice to salinity. Furthermore, we observed that some loci are present exclusively during the early time intervals after salt exposure while others only occur in the later time intervals. This dynamic and complex response of rice to salinity stress led us to develop a 3D visualization software- the 3D-QTL. This software analyzes longitudinal association data, and can be used in any type of species (e.g rice), time-interval (e.g. different years of field trials) and population (e.g. nested association mapping).
    We will present the field data preliminary analyses, and we will discuss how we can tie and correlate the obtained GWAS results under both field and controlled conditions. Our final goal is to further explore the genetic diversity present in the PRAY indica panel, and to develop salt-tolerant rice varieties.


    Dr. Sonia S. Cabrita-Negrao
    Research Scientist
    King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Jedda, Saudi Arabia
     :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 27, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar April 27, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium
    IRRI


    "Genetic characterization of salinity tolerance traits to increase salinity tolerance in crops"
    Author: Mark Tester
    King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, Saudi Arabia

    One-third of the world’s food is produced under irrigation and this is directly threatened by over-exploitation of water resources and global environmental change. This talk will focus on the use of forward genetics to discover genes affecting salinity tolerance in barley, rice, and tomatoes, along with some recent genomics in quinoa, a partially domesticated crop with high salinity tolerance. Rather than studying salinity tolerance as a trait in itself, we dissect salinity tolerance into a series of components that are hypothesised to contribute to overall salinity tolerance.
    For barley, two consecutive years of field trials were conducted at the International Center for Biosaline Agriculture, a site with sandy soil and very low precipitation. Drip irrigation systems allowed the control of salinity by supplying plots with low (1 dS/m) and high (17 dS/m) salinity water. A barley nested association mapping (NAM) population developed by Klaus Pillen has been used to dissect physiologically and genetically complex traits in response to salt stress. Ten traits related to yield and yield components (e.g., days to flowering, harvest index, 100-seed mass) were recorded and five stress indices were derived from each of these measurements. We have identified two significant loci located on the long arms of chromosomes 1H and 5H, which are both associated with several traits contributing to salinity tolerance - days to flowering, days to maturity, harvest index, and yield.
    For tomatoes, the focus is on the genetics of tolerance in wild tomatoes, specifically Solanum galapagense, Solanum cheesmaniae, and Solanum pimpinellifolium. An association genetic approach is being taken. High-quality genome sequences have been made and genotyping-by-sequencing undertaken. Tomatoes have been phenotyped in The Plant Accelerator® and in the field, and analyses are currently in progress.
    The application of this approach provides opportunities to significantly increase abiotic stress tolerance in crops and thus contribute to increasing agricultural production in many regions. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 27, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Social Hour  :: IRRI Events

  • Sunday, April 30, 2017 - Tuesday, May 02, 2017
    (Phase 3 Year 3) Annual Review and Planning Workshop of IRRI-ICAR Collaborative Project on “STRESS-TOLERANT RICE FOR AFRICA AND SOUTH ASIA (STRASA)”  :: IRRI Events

May, 2017
June, 2017
  • Thursday, June 01, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Waterice Inception Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 01, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday seminar by James Quilty @ Thu June 1, 2017 | 1:15pm-2:15pm (PHT) IRRI seminar by James Quilty
    Thursday Seminar
    June 1, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium
    IRRI

    "Challenges and Opportunities - The ZES in Team IRRI"
    Author: James Quilty

    Abstract: This is a time of positive change for Team IRRI. But change often brings challenges. If we can be bold, proactive, and agile, we will see these challenges as opportunities to learn, rethink, improve, and change the way we do things at IRRI. ZES is willing, able, and committed to supporting positive change and overcoming challenges to ensure the sustainability of IRRI into the future. This Thursday, James will provide insights into how Team IRRI is turning challenges in operations into opportunities to improve.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The IRRI seminar committee continues to encourage IRRI staff members to present seminars about their work. When preparing the PowerPoint for the seminar, staff members are encouraged to download and use the standard IRRI PowerPoint template. Also, shortly after most seminars have concluded, the audio file and PowerPoint file from the presentation will be available on a special Google Drive, accessible to staff at HQ and in the country offices. Please find Link to Thursday Seminar folders.
    IRRI seminars are also a forum for invited guests to present information and their opinions on topics relevant to international rice research and the work of IRRI. Speakers at IRRI Seminars are guests of IRRI and we encourage you to welcome them in every way and engage in polite and constructive discussions with them.
    If you have a guest visiting from overseas, or know someone else, who you think would be a suitable candidate to give an IRRI seminar, please email the IRRI seminar committee chair, , to see if they can be fitted into the schedule. The IRRI seminar committee would like to channel all guest and special speakers into the IRRI seminars where possible and we will appreciate your help with this.
    Archived versions including video, audio and/or presentation files (e.g. PowerPoint) for most seminars are available to all staff at HQ and in country offices at this Google Drive location shortly after the presentation.
    https://drive.google.com/a/irri.org/folderview?id=0B-Hz5UNUXAiWR0VTVkNiZG9qOEU&usp=sharing&tid=0B32j9qIvJlopblUxSjk0VHdGTTA&usp=sharing
    2017
    Seminar Committee: Virender Kumar, Paul Quick, Nasreen Khan, Damien Platten, Marichu Bernardo, Rochie Cuevas, and Admin support by Lou Herrero :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, June 02, 2017 10:00am - 12:00pm
    IRRI Executive Team Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Sunday, June 04, 2017 - Wednesday, June 07, 2017
    2017 NSFC-IRRI Joint Workshop on Rice Science  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 08, 2017 09:00am - 09:45am
    Candidate Seminar: Ma. Antonia Elorietta, Manager - Seed Health Unit Seminar Topic: Seed Health Testing and Movement: Challenges and Opportunities

    Note: This is a free-for-all seminar :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, June 09, 2017 - Saturday, June 10, 2017
    Seeds Without Borders: Regional cooperation for seed-sharing  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, June 09, 2017 09:00am - 09:45am
    Candidate Seminar: Brita Dahl Jensen (Candidate, Manager - Seed Health Unit) Topic: Seed Health Testing and Movement: Challenges and Opportunities

    Note: This is a free-for-all seminar :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, June 12, 2017 - Sunday, June 18, 2017
    Annual Meeting of CRP leaders and DDGs Research  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 14, 2017 - Friday, June 16, 2017
    17th Conference of the Science Council of Asia  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, June 27, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD Title: “Improving Machine Transplanting Technology for Hybrid Rice Production”
    Speaker: Prof. Yingbin Zou, Southern Regional Collaborative Innovation Center of Grain and Oil Crops (CICGO)
    Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, China :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 28, 2017
    Roundtable Discussion on IRRI India and S Asia Regional Strategies  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 29, 2017 10:00am - 11:00am
    Seminar: Cyber Security Awareness  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 29, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Social Hour  :: IRRI Events

July, 2017
  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB & GB Joint Division Seminar by Bruno Kistner PB and GB Joint Division Seminar
    (Please click “Add to calendar” to mark it in your calendar. We will not circulate reminders)

    Title: Malnutrition in ASEAN

    Abstract
    The double burden of malnutrition in Asia is a complex problem. Bruno will give an overview of the state and challenges of malnutrition, particularly the problem of obesity, in the region, and provide Philippines-specific findings from the recently launched “Tackling obesity in ASEAN: Prevalence, impact and guidance on interventions” report. He will also speak on public-private partnership and rice fortification as tactics to tackle malnutrition. Bruno heads the Secretariat of the public-private partnership Asia Roundtable on Food Innovation for Improved Nutrition (ARoFIIN), which brings together experts from across government, academia, industry and civil society sectors in Asia, to engage in multi-stakeholder efforts, including dialogue on the role of food innovation, in tackling obesity and chronic disease in the region.


    Bruno Kistner
    Secretary
    Asia Roundtable on Food Innovation for
    Improved Nutrition (ARoFIIN) and Amelia Chong
    Communications, ARoFIIN Secretariat :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, July 14, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    IRRI Health &Wellness Fair  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, July 17, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Nutrition Month event  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 19, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB & GB Joint Division Seminar by Dr. Dmytro Chebotarov PB and GB Joint Division Seminar
    (Please click “Add to calendar” to mark it in your calendar. We will not circulate reminders)

    Title: Population genomics of the 3,000 rice varieties

    Abstract
    In this talk I will present several analyses of 3K dataset and other genomic data at IRRI that might give some insights into rice genome structure, rice diversity and evolution.


    Dr. Dmytro Chebotarov
    Postdoctoral Fellow - Bioinformatics
    International Rice Research Institute :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, July 24, 2017 09:30am - 11:30am
    Golden Rice Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, July 24, 2017 02:00pm - 05:00pm
    IRRI Executive Team Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, July 25, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Rothamstedt Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, July 25, 2017 02:00pm - 05:00pm
    IRRI Executive Team Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 26, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Rothamstedt Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 26, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB & GB Joint Division Seminar by Eliana Monteverde PB and GB Joint Division Seminar
    (Please click “Add to calendar” to mark it in your calendar. We will not circulate reminders)

    Title: Genome wide association mapping and genomic selection for grain quality traits in
    Uruguayan indica and tropical japonica rice

    Abstract
    In some of the major rice-consuming countries there has been a shift from quantity to quality in terms of consumer demand for rice. In these regions, grain quality must be a major focus for rice improvement, mostly for high quality rice exporting countries, which have to increase their rice production with a concomitant increase in grain quality. The most promising way to accomplish this goal is through the application of genomic tools and statistical approaches that are designed to enhance the rate of genetic gain. This study aimed at identifying genomic regions associated to grain quality traits and exploring opportunities for genomic selection of grain quality and agronomical traits in Uruguayan rice. We used two rice elite breeding populations for both GWAS and GS studies, consisting of 324 indica and 308 tropical japonica lines evaluated for yield after milling, percentage head rice, grain chalkiness, grain yield and plant height. A total of 22 QTL for grain quality traits were detected. Genome annotation was performed identifying five major genes involved in starch synthesis and 17 candidate genes associated either with starch metabolism, cell wall synthesis and grain size that co-located with the GWAS-QTL. We compared the prediction ability of single-environment (SE) and multi-environment (ME) genomic prediction models, where the genetic effects are assessed by the Kronecker product of variance-covariance matrices of genetic correlations between environments and genomic kernels (Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Predictor, GBLUP and the Gaussian Kernel, GK). Percent change in mean prediction accuracy of ME models was higher than for SE models for both kernel methods in both datasets. Results confirmed the superiority of multi-environment over single environment prediction models for all traits when genetic correlations between environments are high.

    Eliana Monterverde :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, July 27, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Rothamstedt Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, July 27, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Social Hour  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, July 28, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Rothamstedt Meeting  :: IRRI Events

August, 2017
  • Tuesday, August 01, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Special Seminar  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 03, 2017 03:00pm - 05:00pm
    Q and A session re: Contract Workers by James Quilty  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, August 07, 2017 03:00pm - 05:00pm
    ASEAN Innovations in Rice Science and Farming Symposium  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 08, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Rice Straw Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 08, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    PRISM appreciation workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 09, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Rice Straw Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 09, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    PRISM appreciation workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 09, 2017 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    PB & GB Joint Division Seminar by Dr. Markita Landry PB and GB Joint Division Seminar
    Dr. Markita Landry
    Assistant Professor
    Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
    University of California
    Berkeley, USA


    Title: Nanoparticle-Assisted Delivery of Genetic Material into Mature Plants


    Abstract:
    In light of population growth and a changing global climate, plants form the core arsenal of sustainability efforts, both at the levels of food availability and environmental remediation. Inevitably, engineering smarter plants will require creation and adoption of emerging technology that can lead to more prolific crops and more robust plants. Since the creation of the first transgenic plants, the primary challenge facing the engineering of plants is the introduction of foreign genes into plant cells through the rigid and multi-layered cell wall that is mostly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. Current methods for mature plant transformation are labor- and timeintensive, costly, and can be suitable for a limited number of plant species, thus of limited practical applicability. We present a nanomaterial-based plant gene delivery method that can transfer biomolecules into all phenotypes of any plant species with high efficiency. We design nanomaterial formulations can penetrate the mature plant cell wall and deliver DNA gene vectors into the cytoplasm and nucleus of mature arugula plants. Nanomaterial infiltration of biological cargoes enables spatial and temporal control over genetic transformation of the plant, which can be modeled via diffusive interactions of our nanoparticle platform in plant tissues. Our results demonstrate efficient through-cell-wall DNA delivery into mature plant leaves in a passive and species-independent manner with chemically and electrostatically-modified single-walled and
    multi-walled carbon nanotube gene carriers. We also demonstrate gene silencing with a similar nanoparticle mechanism. Our platform can enable high-throughput parallel testing of plant genetic vectors in mature plants, to rapidly identify genotypes that result in phenotypes of increased plant resistance to drastic changes in climate or crop infections.  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 10, 2017 08:00am - 01:00pm
    Meeting: CGIAR Excellence in Plant Breeding c/o G. Kotch  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 10, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    PRISM appreciation workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 10, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Speaker’s Name(s): Marianne Banziger and Michael Quinn
    Title of the Talk: CGIAR Excellence in Breeding Platform
     :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, August 11, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    PRISM appreciation workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, August 14, 2017 - Friday, August 18, 2017
    IRRI Common Week  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 22, 2017 09:30am - 10:15am
    Candidate Seminar: Dymtro Chebotarov, Scientist I - Computational Genetics Seminar Topic: Linking Genotype and Phenotype: Genome-wide association studies and beyond.

    *Note: This is a free-for-all seminar :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 29, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Pag-IBIG Loyalty Card ID capture and seminar for IRRI Staff  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 30, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Pag-IBIG Loyalty Card ID capture and seminar for IRRI Staff  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 30, 2017 01:30pm - 04:00pm
    Theme Leaders Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 30, 2017 02:00pm - 04:00pm
    Training - Budgeting (Preparation for 2018 Budget Process)  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 31, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar August 31, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium
    IRRI

    Genetic and Genomic Studies of Micronutrients in Maize

    Torbert Rocheford
    Professor and Patterson Endowed Chair of Translational Genomics in Crop Improvement, Department of Agronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

    Research will be primarily reported on provitamin A and total carotenoids in maize grain which has been ongoing for some time. This research involves study of and selection of natural variation to increase levels of the provitamin A carotenoids beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin. The purpose is to help address vitamin A deficiencies in sub-saharan Africa through biofortication of the staple crop maize. Most of the variation for levels of carotenoids is controlled by genes in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, and some variation is controlled by genes in the isoprenoid pathway and by degradation enzymes. Efforts have recently been initiated to study the genetic basis of variation for levels of zinc and iron and maize grain. Preliminary GWAS results are detecting associations for zinc and iron. Provitamin A, zinc and iron represent major micronutrient deficiencies in the developing world, affecting millions of humans. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 31, 2017 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    PB & GB Joint Division Seminar by Dr. Boris Szurek PB and GB Joint Division Seminar

    Dr Boris Szurek
    UMR 186 IRD-UM2-Cirad
    Interactions Plantes-Microorganismes-Environnement (IPME)
    Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    911, Av. Agropolis BP 64501
    34394 Montpellier Cedex 5
    France


    Title: Learning from the pathogen towards tailored-sustainable resistance : the case study of Xanthomonas TAL effector


    Abstract
    Bacterial leaf blight of rice was first reported in Asia around 1880. A century later, it was diagnosed for the first time in West-Africa. Since then, epidemio-survey for BLB was regularly achieved over the last 15 years in various countries of the region, leading to the establishment of an important collection of X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) strains. Genetic characterization of African Xoo using divers typing tools, including genome-based microsatellites, showed that they form a separate group within Xoo and are closely related to X. oryzae pv. oryzicola which is the causal agent of Bacterial Leaf Streak. Here, an overview of our activities related to developing tailored control strategies based on germplasm screening and TAL effector biology will be presented. :: IRRI Events

September, 2017
  • Monday, September 04, 2017 - Tuesday, September 05, 2017
    Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning, Impact Assessment, and Gender (MELIAG) Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 05, 2017 - Wednesday, September 06, 2017
    30th National Rice R&D Conference (NRR&DC)  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, September 07, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    THURSDAY SEMINAR: Takashi Yamano IRRI seminar by Takashi Yamano
    Thursday Seminar
    September 7, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium
    IRRI


    "Lessons Learned from Adoption and Impact Assessment Studies in South Asia"
    Author: Dr. Takashi Yamano
    Senior Scientist, Agrifood Policy Platform


    Abstract:
    The presentation will start with identifying roles of adoption and impact assessment studies at IRRI, by drawing lessons learned from adoption and impact assessment studies under the Rice Monitoring Surveys (RMS) in South Asia. The findings from the adoption and area estimates of stress-tolerant rice varieties, DNA fingerprinting of seed samples collected from farmers, and phone bidding experiments will be described. Potential areas for future inter-disciplinary research and project activities under RMS and other assessment studies will be discussed at the end of the presentation.


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The IRRI seminar committee continues to encourage IRRI staff members to present seminars about their work. When preparing the PowerPoint for the seminar, staff members are encouraged to download and use the standard IRRI PowerPoint template. Also, shortly after most seminars have concluded, the audio file and PowerPoint file from the presentation will be available on a special Google Drive, accessible to staff at HQ and in the country offices. Please find Link to Thursday Seminar folders.
    IRRI seminars are also a forum for invited guests to present information and their opinions on topics relevant to international rice research and the work of IRRI. Speakers at IRRI Seminars are guests of IRRI and we encourage you to welcome them in every way and engage in polite and constructive discussions with them.
    If you have a guest visiting from overseas, or know someone else, who you think would be a suitable candidate to give an IRRI seminar, please email the IRRI seminar committee chair, , to see if they can be fitted into the schedule. The IRRI seminar committee would like to channel all guest and special speakers into the IRRI seminars where possible and we will appreciate your help with this.
    Archived versions including video, audio and/or presentation files (e.g. PowerPoint) for most seminars are available to all staff at HQ and in country offices at this Google Drive location shortly after the presentation.
    https://drive.google.com/a/irri.org/folderview?id=0B-Hz5UNUXAiWR0VTVkNiZG9qOEU&usp=sharing&tid=0B32j9qIvJlopblUxSjk0VHdGTTA&usp=sharing
    2017
    Seminar Committee: Virender Kumar, Paul Quick, Nasreen Khan, Damien Platten, Marichu Bernardo, Rochie Cuevas, and Admin support by Lou Herrero :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 12, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Training of Agricultural Extension Workers on PRISM Crop Health Protocols  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 13, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Training of Agricultural Extension Workers on PRISM Crop Health Protocols  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, September 14, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Training of Agricultural Extension Workers on PRISM Crop Health Protocols  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, September 14, 2017 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    Rice Breeding and Strategic Innovation Joint Platform Seminar by Dr. Richard Mott PB and GB Joint Division Seminar
    (Please click “Add to calendar” to mark it in your calendar. We will not circulate reminders)

    Richard Mott
    Weldon Professor of Computational and Statistical Genetics
    UCL Genetics Institute, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT


    Title: Sequencing Populations to Find Causal Genetic Variants

    Abstract:
    We describe two approaches, based on sequencing a population at low coverage, to impute single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the absence of a haplotype reference panel, and to detect structural variation (SVs). These methods are applicable to any species including crops, and in particular populations descended from known inbred lines such as MAGIC populations. The first approach is described in (Davies et al 2016 Nat Genetics.48:965-969 PMID: 2737623). It assumes an unknown set of haplotypes (the reference panel) segregate at each locus in the population, and that each chromosome is a mosaic of these unknown haplotypes. It then simultaneously estimates the panel and the individual chromosome mosaics using a hidden Markov model that utilises features of low-coverage sequence data. The number of unknown haplotypes at each locus is a variable dependent on the population history. We apply this method to humans, mice and Arabidopsis MAGIC and show that common variants can be imputed accurately using only modest levels of sequence coverage (between 0.1x an 1.5x depending on the population history). The second approach also uses low-coverage sequence to identify regions that are structurally variant, and if they are due to a transposition, the originating locus of the transposition. Applying this method to the Arabidopsis MAGIC population (Imprialou et al 2017 Genetics 205:1425-1441. PMID: 28179367) identified thousands of SVs of which about a quarter were transpositions, and mapped SVs that were likely to be functional for fungal resistance and germination. Of interest, for some phenotypes structural variation explains more heritability than does SNP variation. :: IRRI Events

  • Saturday, September 16, 2017 02:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFIRE Mini Reunion cum BINGO  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, September 18, 2017 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    Soil, Climate & Water Cluster Kick-off Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - Thursday, September 21, 2017
    Council for Partnership in Rice Research in Asia (CORRA) Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 19, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Training of Agricultural Extension Workers on PRISM Crop Health Protocols  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 19, 2017 11:00am - 01:00pm
    IRRI-UPLB Joint Management Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 20, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Training of Agricultural Extension Workers on PRISM Crop Health Protocols  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, September 21, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Training of Agricultural Extension Workers on PRISM Crop Health Protocols  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, September 22, 2017 02:30pm - 03:30pm
    Rice Breeding and Strategic Innovation Joint Platform Seminar  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 26, 2017 08:30am - 05:00pm
    Philippines-France Forum on Agriculture  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 27, 2017 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    IRC Organizing Team Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, September 28, 2017 05:00pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Social Hour  :: IRRI Events

October, 2017
  • Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - Thursday, October 05, 2017
    Sustainable Rice Platform: First Global Sustainable Rice Conference and Exhibition 2017  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, October 04, 2017 - Thursday, October 05, 2017 08:00am - 05:00pm
    First Global Sustainable Rice Conference and Exhibition 2017

    The Sustainable Rice Platform (SRP) is a global multi-stakeholder partnership to promote resource efficiency and sustainability both on-farm and throughout the rice value chain. The initiative was co-convened by UN Environment and the International Rice Research Institute in December 2011, and works in collaboration with over 70 institutional partners in the public and private sectors as well as the research and NGO communities.

    Each year, the alliance brings together its members and dialogue partners to discuss collaborative approaches and innovative solutions to critical sustainability challenges facing the rice sector.

    We are therefore pleased to issue this First Announcement for the 2017 Global Sustainable Rice Conference and Exhibition, organized by the Sustainable Rice Platform, in collaboration with UN Environment and the International Rice Research Institute, from 4 -5 October at the UN Convention Centre, Bangkok.

    Conference tracks include:

    • Global Rice Market and Food Security
    • Economic and Financial Incentives for Sustainability
    • Farm Management and Technology Tools
    • Sustainable Rice Standards and Indicators
    • Supply Chain Assurance Models
    • Innovations in Crop Protection

    Call for Papers

    We invite the global rice industry to share their experiences at this unique platform. Terms and conditions apply, and the Conference Organising Committee reserves the right to apply its discretion. Speakers will qualify for the discounted SRP member rate for conference registration.

    Please click here to complete the form with details of your proposed topic »

    Call for Sponsorship and Exhibition

    Interested in exhibiting your product? Want to raise your profile through a presentation? Options are limited, and will be approved depending on the nature of product / service and its relevance to conference themes. Please contact Jonathan Kiang to discuss options.

    Programme at a glance

    chart glance sustainable rice

    logo

     :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, October 09, 2017 - Tuesday, October 10, 2017
    MyRice Project Final Review/Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, October 09, 2017 10:00am - 11:00am
    Joint seminar of Agrifood Policy and Sustainable Impact Platforms Detecting rice crop and water management practices with remote sensing imagery. An overview of the research topics and fieldwork of three MSc students from ITC

    Andy Nelson
    Vidya Nahdhiyatul Fikriyah
    Sravan Shrestha
    Kuan Chai
    ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands

    Detecting rice crop and water management practices with remote sensing imagery. An overview of the research topics and fieldwork of three MSc students from ITC

    Vidya Nahdhiyatul Fikriyah1, Sravan Shrestha1, Kuan Chai1, Roshanak Darvishzadeh1, Alice Laborte2 and Andy Nelson1
    1 ITC - Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation of the University of Twente, Netherlands
    2 IRRI – International Rice Research Institute

    Remote sensing imagery is being used to map rice growing areas across several countries in Asia. This imagery, from both satellite and airborne platforms, can provide information on: area; establishment and harvesting dates; losses due to various calamities, and plant growth parameters as inputs to yield estimation models. While research on this continues, such information is already being delivered in pre-operational or operational systems in several countries, providing estimates of where, when and how much rice is grown for a given location and season.

    Once these essential characteristics of rice production have been provided to users, there are often requests to provide more nuanced information on how rice is grown, especially related to different crop and water management practices. On this basis, ITC, in collaboration with IRRI and the DA-PhilRice-IRRI Philippine Rice Information System (PRISM), has developed three MSc thesis topics to explore the use of remote sensing data to distinguish between:

    · Irrigated and rainfed rice.
    · Direct seeded or transplanted rice.
    · Different cropping intensities, such as single rice, double rice or rice grown with another crop.
    Three of the authors of the presentation are MSc students at ITC that have developed their MSc research questions and research methodologies around these topics.

    The presentation will first briefly introduce ITC and it’s unique role in research, education and capacity development in geo-spatial science. It will then give an overview of the three MSc topics and how the students will explore the capability of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) remote sensing imagery to detect different rice crop and water management practices. Finally it will give some impressions of the farmer surveys and basic field measurements conducted by the students in Central Luzon in Sep/Oct 2017. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 12, 2017 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday seminar IRRI seminar by Nese Sreenivasulu
    Thursday Seminar

    October 12, 2017
    1:15pm-2:15pm, Havener Auditorium
    IRRI


    "What rice scientists can offer to the sugary world ?- Low Glycaemic Index Rice application in Diabetes Prevention and Management"
    Author: Dr. Nese Sreenivasulu
    Senior Scientist, Grain Quality and Nutrition Center


    Abstract:
    The world is experiencing an epidemic of diabetes with 450 million incidences and more than 50% of them occur in Asia being the hot spot. Factors driving this epidemic are urbanization associated sedentary lifestyle, higher energy intake through modern diet. Diet plays an important role where rice being the staple food in Asia. Rice lines with slower starch digestibility provide opportunities in mitigating the global rise in type II diabetes and related non-communicable diseases. However, screening for low glycemic index (GI) in rice breeding programs is not possible due to time and cost constraints. This study evaluated the feasibility of using in vitro cooked grain amylolysis, starch mobilization patterns during seed germination, and variation in starch structure and composition in the mature seed to differentiate patterns of starch digestibility. The combination of these biochemical markers can be used as an alternative measure to predict GI. Additionally, transcriptome analysis of stored mRNA transcripts in high and low GI lines detected differences in starch metabolism and confirmed the importance of seed storage pathways in influencing digestibility. Pathway analyses supported by metabolomics data revealed that resistant starch, cell wall non-starch polysaccharides, and flavonoids potentially contribute to slower digestibility. These new insights can guide precision breeding programs to produce low GI rice with acceptable cooking quality to help mitigate the burden of diet-associated lifestyle diseases. Clinical studies evidences have proven that type2 diabetes is not only preventable but curable through intervention of low GI diets enriched with nutrients and fiber. For diabetes prevention, we need to implement novel systems approaches in the promotion of low GI foods and community based effective physical activities to engage population.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The IRRI seminar committee continues to encourage IRRI staff members to present seminars about their work. When preparing the PowerPoint for the seminar, staff members are encouraged to download and use the standard IRRI PowerPoint template. Also, shortly after most seminars have concluded, the audio file and PowerPoint file from the presentation will be available on a special Google Drive, accessible to staff at HQ and in the country offices. Please find Link to Thursday Seminar folders.
    IRRI seminars are also a forum for invited guests to present information and their opinions on topics relevant to international rice research and the work of IRRI. Speakers at IRRI Seminars are guests of IRRI and we encourage you to welcome them in every way and engage in polite and constructive discussions with them.
    If you have a guest visiting from overseas, or know someone else, who you think would be a suitable candidate to give an IRRI seminar, please email the IRRI seminar committee chair, , to see if they can be fitted into the schedule. The IRRI seminar committee would like to channel all guest and special speakers into the IRRI seminars where possible and we will appreciate your help with this.
    Archived versions including video, audio and/or presentation files (e.g. PowerPoint) for most seminars are available to all staff at HQ and in country offices at this Google Drive location shortly after the presentation.
    https://drive.google.com/a/irri.org/folderview?id=0B-Hz5UNUXAiWR0VTVkNiZG9qOEU&usp=sharing&tid=0B32j9qIvJlopblUxSjk0VHdGTTA&usp=sharing
    2017
    Seminar Committee: Virender Kumar, Paul Quick, Nasreen Khan, Damien Platten, Marichu Bernardo, Rochie Cuevas, and Admin support by Lou Herrero :: IRRI Events

November, 2017