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2015
January, 2015
  • Monday, January 05, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    candidate seminar: Head - Partnership Office position  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, January 06, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    candidate seminar: Scientist - GIS and Remote Sensing​ position  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, January 07, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    candidate seminar: Scientist - GIS and Remote Sensing​ position  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 08, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    candidate seminar: Head - Partnership Office position  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 09, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    candidate seminar: Head - Partnership Office position  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, January 13, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD Typical climate patterns observed in Los Baños and possible
    applications for crop management

    Helen Grace Centeno
    Associate Scientist
    and
    Reiner Wassman
    Head
    Climate Unit, CESDivision


    Abstract. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center released a statement, ”There is an approximately 65% chance that El Niño conditions will be present during the Northern Hemisphere winter and last into the Northern Hemisphere spring 2015’’. This seasonal forecast means that in Los Baños we can expect exceptionally dry conditions from December 2014 to March 2015. However, to date, we have experienced the opposite of El Niño conditions. This does not mean that the forecast of El Niño is incorrect. Instead of basing local forecasts on global outlooks, it might be better to look into local records over recent years. Established in 1979, the IRRI Climate Unit has amassed weather and climate data, which has been made available in a structured database. Recent data have been analyzed to determine typical weather patterns and extremes. This presentation will demonstrate case studies that show how weather and climate data can be used in rice research, specifically (a) to determine start of cropping season, (b) to forecast for dry periods, and (c) to identify locations ideal for seed multiplication. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, January 14, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    candidate seminar: Scientist - Climate Change position Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Rice: Bridging from Research Findings to Adoption across Scales

    By Dr. Bjoern Ole Sander
    Candidate for Scientist, Climate Change

    14 January 2015, Wednesday
    9:00 AM - 10:00AM
    Seminar Room A, DL Umali Building :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 16, 2015 06:00pm - 08:30pm
    AFSTRI Cultural Night  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, January 19, 2015 - Friday, January 23, 2015
    GGIAR Gender and Agricultural Network Annual Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, January 19, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm
    Joint Seminar: PBGB-TTCGRC Analysis of variability of rice promoter sequences


    Dr. Tatiana V. Tatarinova
    Associate Professor of Research Pediatrics
    USC Keck School of Medicine, USA


    1100-1200H, Monday, 19 January 2015
    PBGB Conference Room 1

    Abstract:

    CG content in the third codon position (GC3) in rice has unique bimodal distribution. We have previously found relationship between GC3, gene expression, gene function, DNA methylation and other features. In current work we examine promoter organisation and variability for various classes of genes in rice. :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, January 20, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
    myPAD Information Sessions  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, January 20, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    PBGB Special Seminar Optimizing plant walls for biorefinery applications -using rice and Arabidopsis as model plants


    Dr. Henrik V. Scheller
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Joint Bioenergy Institute, Berkeley
    University of California-Berkeley, Department of Plant and Microbial Biology


    1:15-2:15, Tuesday, 20 January 2015
    PBGB Conference Room 1 :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, January 21, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Joint Seminar: CESD and SSD Enhancement of wetland sciences through open innovation network
    using tropical HyperObservation System (THOS)


    Prof. Mitsuru Osaki
    Research Faculty of Agriculture
    Hokkaido University, Japan


    Abstract: Eleven of the fifteen big river deltas are located between tropical and subtropical zones, and most of them are seriously influenced by climate change impacts such as sea level rise, flood and drought. As the deltas have fertile soil and a good supply of fresh water, they have historically maintained high human populations. Changes like pollution, land degradation, and LULUCF (land use and land use change and forestry) in the delta ecosystems will have major impacts on human activities in these deltas. The Tropical HyperObservation System (THOS) was introduced to study the key factors of ecosystems in the tropical zone, especially catchment in deltas using an innovative technology, a hypersenser. At first, the THOS was introduced in the Mekong Delta area and Southeast Asian maritime continent adjacent to the Mekong Delta (referred to as Mekong Delta ecosystems). Then, based on the results from this core study, THOS was expanded to the whole tropical zone ecosystems to establish the THOS network. The tropical and subtropical regions are a rich repository of issues of human-ecology-environment hyperlinkage (HEEH) system, and it includes unique zones such as: 1) delta zone (75% of the main delta in the world is in tropical and subtropical regions), 2) high biodiversity zones (terrestrial Borneo, the Amazon basin, and the mountain, coastal and sea areas of Southeast Asia); 3) high carbon reservoir ecosystem (peatland, wetland, mangrove, coral in Southeast Asia, Amazon basin, and Central Africa); and 4) natural disaster zone (increasing sea level and drought or flood due to climate change). An HEEH system is extremely complex. Reliable satelite remotely sensed information related to an HEEH system is hard to obtain in tropical zone, because of heavy clouds. Also, it is very difficult to apply conventional remote sensing in tropical ecosystem analyses, because the number of spectral bands in conventional sensors is small. The microsatellite and the hyperspectral sensor are innovating tropical real-time observation systems. Mega data analyses using information collected through the microsatellite, hyperspectral sensor will contribute to resolving problems in socio-economic system analyses, and to HEEH system management to mitigate impacts from climate change in the deltas of tropical and subtropical regions.
     :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, January 21, 2015 01:15pm - 02:00pm
    myPAD Information Sessions  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, January 21, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB Division Rice genome recorded ancient pararetrovirus activities: relationship of virus genealogy to rice speciation


    Dr. Yuji Kishima
    Professor
    Laboratory of Plant Breeding, Research Faculty of Agriculture/
    Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan


    1400H, Wednesday, 21 January 2015
    PBGB Conference Room 1 :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 22, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    FSSP Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, January 22, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
    myPAD Information Sessions  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 23, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm
    Mainstreaming Gender in CGIAR Research: Policy & Good Practice Mainstreaming gender in CGIAR research: policy and good practice


    Dr. Jacqueline Ashby
    Senior Adviser for Gender Research
    CGIAR Consortium


    Abstract
    Policy instituted by the CGIAR Fund Council and Consortium Board since early 2012 seeks to mainstream attention to gender in research -- to include consideration of gender differences in agriculture across the research cycle, from planning to delivery of outputs and assessment of their impact. After explaining the main components of this policy and the findings of a review of progress with gender mainstreaming in research completed in 2013, the way the Fund Council is now monitoring this mainstreaming will be covered, along with the Gender Action Plan for research recently funded by the Fund Council for three years. Some of the challenges of integrating gender into research for social scientists and research managers will be discussed, as well as some of the good practices emerging. Discussion after the presentation will be an opportunity to share and reflect on experience at IRRI with mainstreaming gender in research. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 23, 2015 01:15pm - 02:00pm
    myPAD Information Sessions  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 23, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Joint Special Seminar: PBGB-CESD Rice defence against plant-parasitic nematodes


    Dr. Tina Kyndt
    Professor
    Department of Molecular Biotechnology
    Ghent University, Belgium

    1400H, Friday, 23 January 2015
    PBGB Conference Room 1 :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, January 26, 2015 - Friday, January 30, 2015
    IRRI-GRiSP Science Week  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, January 30, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    Country Office Meeting  :: IRRI Events

February, 2015
  • Monday, February 02, 2015 - Friday, February 06, 2015
    GRISP Evaluation and Inception Meeting/Review  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 02, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 03, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Special Seminar: SSD The Social Science Sequel to ‘Growing Rice like Wheat’: Transition towards dry rice cultivation requires integration of natural and social sciences


    Dr. Paul C. Struik
    Head of the Centre for Crop Systems Analysis and Professor of Crop Physiology
    Wageningen University, Wageningen
    The Netherlands :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 03, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 03, 2015 01:15pm - 02:00pm
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 04, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Special Seminar: CESD Growing Rice Like Wheat


    Mr. Niteen Kadam
    IRRI and Wageningen University (WU), The Netherlands

    Ms. Beatriz A. Jimenez
    Mr. Giovanni Melandri
    Wageningen University, The Netherlands

    Ms. Wenjing Ouyang
    Yangzhou University, China and WU, The Netherlands

    Ms. Preethi VR Reddy
    University of Agriculture Sciences, Bangalore and WU, The Netherlands


    Background:

    Growing Rice Like Wheat brings together groups from Wageningen UR in The Netherlands, UAS in Bangalore, Yangzhou University in China, and IRRI in a project that targets drought tolerance in rice. With 6 PhDs, GRLW integrates genetic, physiological, morphological and anatomical studies in rice to address the question whether rice can be grown like wheat. An unbiased association mapping approach identifies genetic factors involved in drought tolerance in rice. More detailed anatomical, physiological and molecular studies give insight in traits contributing to drought tolerance. Thus, the project provides information and tools for breeding rice varieties that can grow with less water. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 05, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    LB Tourism Council Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 05, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 05, 2015 03:00pm - 03:45pm
    HRS Policy Information  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, February 06, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    candidate seminar:Scientist, Irrigated Systems Agronomist  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 09, 2015 - Friday, February 13, 2015
    PRISM Crop Health Workshop Component B c/o A. Sparks  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 09, 2015 01:15pm - 02:00pm
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 10, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD Triple rice: is it feasible for the south-central
    coastal zone of Bangladesh?


    Nibir Kumar Saha
    PhD, Research Scholar
    CSISA-CPWF-IRRI Bangladesh

    Abstract: The southern region of Bangladesh experiences multiple challenges including excessive flooding, soil salinity, severe cyclonic storms and tidal surges. However, the south-central (SC) region is blessed by large rivers, in which the water remains non-saline year-round, a dense network of small river canals across the landscape, and polders to protect the lands from tidal flooding during the rainy season. Despite these resources, cropping system intensity is very low, with a low yielding, rainy season rice crop (aman) over most of the landscape, which is only sometimes preceded by an early rainy season rice crop (aus), and followed by a low yielding legume. Large areas of land lie fallow for several months each year. We hypothesized that with improved water management (especially drainage) and the use of modern high yielding rice varieties, that intensification to a triple rice cropping system may be feasible. This hypothesis was tested in an experiment conducted for two years (2012-14) in the south central coastal zone. The research showed that triple rice systems are feasible in the south central coastal zone of Bangladesh, with maximum annual system yields of 15-16 t/ha, up to five times that of current farmer practice. The seminar will show the key strategies needed for achieving such large increases in system productivity. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 11, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, February 12, 2015 11:00am - 11:45am
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, February 13, 2015 01:15pm - 02:00pm
    HRS Policy Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 17, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD Rice-rice-rabi cropping systems for increasing the productivity of low salinity regions of the
    coastal zone of Bangladesh

    Jayanta Bhattacharya
    PhD Research Scholar
    CSISA-CPWF-IRRI-Patuakhali Science
    and Technology University

    Abstract: In the coastal zone of Bangladesh, farmers typically grow a single crop of rice (aman) during the rainy season using low yielding (~3 t/ha) and late maturing local varieties, sometimes followed by a low input and low yielding rabi (dry season) pulse or sesame crop (0-1 t/ha), and sometimes preceded by an early rainy season rice crop (aus) (~3 t/ha). The possibility of increasing productivity by a growing high yielding, short duration and salt tolerant aus variety followed by high yielding aman varieties, without jeopardizing yield of the aman crop, has been shown previously. The work presented in this seminar sought to build on this by evaluating the feasibility of intensifying to an aus-aman-rabi cropping system using high value rabi crops, in this case hybrid maize and hybrid sunflower. Replicated experiments were conducted for two years (2012-14) in the south central coastal zone comparing a range of cropping system options based around aus establishment date, choice of rabi crop, and mulching. The work showed that it is possible to implement highly productive aus-aman-rabi cropping systems, with total rice equivalent system yields of 13.9 to 19.3 t/ha/yr. The seminar will show the key strategies needed for achieving such large increases in system productivity. :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 17, 2015 01:30pm - 03:00pm
    OJT Orientation  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - Friday, February 20, 2015
    USAID-Cambodia Project Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 18, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar:candidate for HRS Business Partner - Country Office (IRRI Myanmar)  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 18, 2015 12:00pm - 01:00pm
    Ash Wednesday Mass  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, February 18, 2015 02:00pm - 05:00pm
    HRS Medical Task Force Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 23, 2015 - Tuesday, February 24, 2015
    Rice Crop Manager Updating and Introduction for Monitoring Tool Group: Dr. Roland Buresh, CESD-Soils Nutrient Management
    Project: DA-BAR RCM  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, February 23, 2015 - Friday, February 27, 2015
    PRISM Crop Health Workshop c/o A. Sparks  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, February 24, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Seminar: SSD Rice preferences, price margins and constraints of rice value chain actors in Nueva Ecija, Philippines



    Junghwan Bae
    Intern, Social Sciences Division, and
    Bachelor's degree (Agricultural Economics) student,
    Seoul National University, Republic of Korea


    Abstract
    Based on focus group discussions with farmers and interviews with other rice value chain actors, their rice preferences, price margins and constraints were identified. I will share my observations and insights from my trip to Nueva Ecija and seven-week internship at IRRI. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, February 27, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Scientist - Agronomy/Water Scientist position based in Bangladesh  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, February 27, 2015 05:30pm - 07:00pm
    AFSTRI Board 2015 Handover Ceremony  :: IRRI Events

March, 2015
  • Monday, March 02, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Scientist - Agronomy/Water Scientist position based in Bangladesh  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 03, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    International Women's Day Celebration  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 04, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    7 Habits Signature Program  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 04, 2015 04:00pm - 05:00pm
    Artist Talk and Demo (Special Exhibit "Kiping in Touch")  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 05, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    7 Habits Signature Program  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 06, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    7 Habits Signature Program  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 06, 2015 01:00pm - 02:00pm
    Joint Seminar: SSD and CESD The Role of Crop Modeling and Remote Sensing in Rice Productivity Improvement


    Dr. Tri Setiyono
    Scientist, Crop Modeler
    IRRI
    Social Sciences Division


    Abstract
    The presentation will highlight how current advances in crop simulation modeling and remote sensing application are used to generate timely and accurate rice productivity information to support decision making for food security and economic development and for other applications. Remote-sensing data assimilation into crop simulation model effectively captures responses of rice crops to environmental conditions over large spatial coverage, which otherwise is practically impossible to achieve. Such improvement of actual yield estimates offers practical application such as in a crop insurance program. The use of process-based crop simulation model ensures climate information is adequately captured and to enable in-season yield forecast. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 06, 2015 02:00pm - 05:00pm
    IFSA General Assembly  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 06, 2015 07:00pm - 09:00pm
    Hail and Farewell Party  :: IRRI Events

  • Saturday, March 07, 2015 12:00pm - 05:00pm
    ECDC General Assembly  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 10, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    myOrientation  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 10, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
    Preparatory Briefing/ Meeting for the upcoming DA-IRRI-FSSP Media Engagement Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 10, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD A model using additive log-transformed yield components
    to analyze GxE effects in sugarcane

    Eric Gozé
    Biometrician & Agronomist
    Agro-ecology and Sustainable Intensification of
    Annual Crops Research Unit
    CIRAD


    Abstract: A simple method for analyzing yield components relies on a logarithmic transformation of the yield and its components. The variance of each log component determines its potential contribution to the yield while the covariances with the other components compute for the plasticity compensation influenced by the other components. A multivariate analysis of the variance on seven log transformed sucrose yield components from 155 sugarcane accessions in two sites with contrasted photo-thermal conditions was performed along with a regression analysis of the sucrose yield and yield components on the estimated proportion of S. spontaneum in the accessions’ genome. The respective contributions of the major yield components to sucrose yield and the effect of the estimated proportion of S. spontaneum on sucrose yield were found to significantly vary across different sites. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 11, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB Complementary methods for rice Zn gene discovery

    Nicholas Warnock
    School of Biological Sciences
    Flinders University, Australia


    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 11 March 2015
    Umali Room A

    Abstract

    The Stangoulis group at Flinders University is developing a range of ionomics methods for study of cereal crops. One application of these tools is the investigation of Zn loading in rice, with the aim of identifying the proteins and genes responsible for increased Zn uptake. To date, XRF, ICP-MS and Zn-specific fluorophores have been used in this work, and other technologies are now being installed. Each of these offers different levels of specificity, allowing us to quantify single or many elements simultaneously. These analyses have been paired with protein electrophoresis, protein HPLC, genome-wide analyses and soon transcriptomic analysis, which broadly represent different methods of investigating the same biochemical pathways. It is anticipated that these experiments will yield definitive results regarding control of Zn loading in rice, and that the different approaches will overlap to give increased confidence in the findings. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 12, 2015 - Friday, March 13, 2015
    Q1 Health and Wellness Fair  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 13, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: SSD How does drought-tolerant rice help farmers?
    Evidence from randomized control trials in eastern India


    Dr. Takashi Yamano
    Sr. Scientist – Impact Assessment Specialist
    Social Sciences Division
    IRRI


    Abstract
    By using data from a randomized control trial (RCT) of 1,680 farmers in eastern India, this paper investigates how a drought-tolerant rice variety, called Sahbhagi Dhan, helps farmers. In the RCT, farmers in treatment villages received 5 kg seeds of Sahbhagi Dhan before Kharif, which is the main agricultural season in India, in 2012 or 2013. The paper finds that Sahbhagi Dhan enabled farmers cultivate crops after Kharif partly because of its short duration. The impact was larger when farmers experienced severe drought in Kharif so that farmers can compensate the crop loss in the season. This helps farmers to become less vulnerable against crops chocks. However, the average yield of Sahbhagi Dhan was found lower than that of other rice varieties under both normal and drought conditions. The findings in this paper suggest that Sahbhagi Dhan to be promoted in areas where the potential for double cropping is under-exploited.  :: IRRI Events

  • Saturday, March 14, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    Media Engagement Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 16, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Women & Leadership  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 17, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Preparing for Leadership (Module 1)  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 17, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD New insights into the physiological mechanisms
    of drought resistance in rice

    Alex Grondin
    Post-doctoral fellow
    Drought Physiology Group
    CESD

    Abstract: Significant efforts have been made to develop rice varieties resistant to drought through breeding programs or transgenic approaches, but little is known about the physiological mechanisms involved. A number of traits have been proposed to be beneficial under drought stress, and it is likely that these traits are interacting together to confer drought resistance in field conditions. This presentation will highlight research aimed to characterize physiologically drought yield QTL lines from a cross between Moroberekan and Swarna, and transgenic lines transformed with a gene potentially involved in drought resistance. I will present results linking an original root system architecture in the QTL lines on one hand, and somaclonal variations in the transgenic lines on the other hand, to yield performance under drought. Furthermore, the characterization of aquaporin (water channel) function in root water fluxes and their role in leaf water content and transpiration will be discussed. Altogether, the knowledge resulting from our studies involving breeding, transgenic and functional genomics approaches could help in efficiently combining different QTLs/genes to improve drought resistance and to avoid trade-offs under favorable conditions. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 18, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Preparing for Leadership (Module 1)  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 18, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB Weedy rice for breeding and genetics studies

    Dr. Prasanta Subudhi
    Professor
    School of Plant, Environmental and Soil Sciences
    Louisiana State University Agricultural Center


    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 18 March 2015
    Umali Room A

    Abstract:

    Weedy rice infestation in commercial rice fields result in loss of both rice yield and quality. It is an annual conspecific weed relative of cultivated rice with high degree of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity. Its compatibility with cultivated facilitates synthesis of unique genetic materials for genetic analysis of complex traits. Cultivated rice and weedy rice differ with respect to a number of agronomic and domestication traits, which can be studied systematically using the genetic and genomics resources such as RIL and CSSL populations and whole genome sequence data. Appearance of novel phenotypic segregants in cultivar x weedy rice cross suggests that weedy rice could be an ideal model for analyzing genetic interactions. Understanding the genetic basis of hidden diversity underlying both agronomic and domestication traits will facilitate exploitation of weedy rice in rice breeding program.​ :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 19, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Preparing for Leadership (Module 1)  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 19, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Ethos, pathos, and logos toward the successful management of rice tungro disease


    II-Ryong Choi
    Senior Scientist 1 - Plant Virology
    PBGB

    Abstract:

    Rice tungro is a neglected disease because it is restricted mostly to developing countries in South and Southeast Asia. For the past half century, IRRI has been making tremendous efforts to alleviate the problems associated with tungro. However, tungro still remains a persistent obstacle to intensified rice production in Asia. This presentation will address the track record (ethos) of IRRI in tungro research, the frustration (pathos) of farmers who have been left behind, and the promising management options (logos) IRRI can offer to encourage more people to engage in holistic efforts toward the successful management of tungro. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 20, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    Celebration: 2014 Mentoring Program  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 20, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Charity Book Sale  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 23, 2015 - Friday, March 27, 2015 08:00am - 09:00am
    Breeders' Week  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 23, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Breeders Week activity  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 23, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Yield Simulation and Mapping Training under the RIICE Project  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 24, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Breeders Week activity  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 24, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Yield Simulation and Mapping Training under the RIICE Project  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 24, 2015 03:00pm - 04:30pm
    IRRI Joint OHS Committee Meeting, 24 March Dear OHS Committee Members,

    Kindly free-up your schedules and confirm attendance for the next IRRI Joint OHS Committee Meeting on 24 March 2015, 3-4:30 PM (PHT) at the Board Room, FFHill.

    See shared recommended agenda and minutes of the last meeting for comments and as reference.

    A separate Webex invite would be sent to Country Office Representatives/members of the committee.

    If there are changes to the committee membership, please let us know.

    Thank you.

    Jose :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 25, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Breeders Week activity  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 25, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Yield Simulation and Mapping Training under the RIICE Project  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 25, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Seminar: SSD Gender mainstreaming in agricultural extension: A case study from coastal Bangladesh


    Linta Matthew
    MA Development Studies
    University of Warwick, United Kingdom
    SSD Intern


    Abstract
    Gender mainstreaming in agricultural extension aims at achieving gender equity by ensuring men and women's equal access to agricultural inputs, training and information. Officially listing women as farmers is the first step towards mainstreaming gender in agricultural extension. It not only formally recognizes women's contribution to agriculture but also opens up opportunities for women to systematically access agricultural extension services. The process to enlist women has begun recently in many developing countries as part of fulfilling the gender mainstreaming mandate of the agricultural programs. However, not much information exists regarding the factors that facilitate or impede women's official participation agricultural extension and how the target clients feel about this initiative. Given this background, we present a case study from the south-center coast of Bangladesh where 216 male and female farmers' were interviewed about women's active engagement in agricultural extension. A logit regression model was estimated to identify the
    factors that influence the official participation of women in farming. It has been hypothesized that woman in rural households with adverse socio-economic conditions were officially listed as farmers. Such an analysis is important as officially listing women was found to increase the decision making power of women, through better access to credit, savings, training and agricultural information; thereby increasing the empowerment of women. Hence, it is vital to know the beneficiaries of such programs, such that intervention programs to increase the official participation of women in agriculture can be better targeted. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, March 25, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB Developing rice cultivars for Cambodia

    Dr. Zhao Dule
    Scientist II (Plant Breeder) and
    IRRI Representative for Cambodia


    1300-1400H, Wednesday, 25 March 2015
    PBGB Conference Room 1


    Abstract

    In Cambodia, rice is the staple crop grown in both dry and wet seasons, but rainfed lowland in the wet season is the major rice ecosystem. Under the ACIAR-supported project ‘Improved rice germplasm for Cambodia and Australia’ (2010-2015), we have evaluated about 1500 introductions, mainly from IRRI, for aerobic, irrigated, and rainfed ecosystems, identified a number of promising lines, and released two varieties. The project initiated a new breeding program at the Cambodian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) targeting at the dry season rice cultivars with early maturity, good grain quality and high yield, and at the wet season rice cultivars with lodging resistance, drought/submergence tolerance. The project also conducted research on sensory quality of Cambodian rice aiming at finding QTLs for good sensory quality. In the presentation, I will briefly introduce rice production in Cambodia, report the research results, and discuss the breeding goals for Cambodia.  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 26, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    HRDC Annual Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 26, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Yield Simulation and Mapping Training under the RIICE Project  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, March 26, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Neuroactive and antimicrobial compounds from bacteria isolated from marine mollusks

    by:
    Gisela P. Concepcion
    Vice President for Academic Affairs
    University of the Philippines System
    &
    Professor
    The Marine Science Institute
    University of the Philippines Diliman

    Abstract:
    Marine bacteria have been a rich source of novel bioactive compounds for many years. In many cases, these bacteria have been found in close association with marine invertebrates. In our research program, bacteria are isolated from dissected tissues of marine mollusks and cultured in the laboratory. Small-scale cultures undergo preliminary bioactivity screening and are prioritized for isolation and purification of bioactive compounds. In this talk, we will present our work on some of the bacterial isolates and the compounds they produce, which exhibit significant neuroactivity and antimicrobial activity. These compounds are being pursued further as potential drugs. Work on microbial genomes showing the biosynthesis genes and pathways for these compounds will also be presented.

    &

    Testing the utility of the COI and 16S genes as DNA barcode markers in species delineation on two selected animal taxa

    by:
    Ian Kendrich C. Fontanilla
    Assistant Professor & Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
    College of Science
    University of the Philippines, Diliman

    Abstract:
    DNA barcoding is a novel technique for taxonomic identification of different species at the molecular level. Its premise lies on its ability to distinguish species based on interspecific genetic differences, which should be greater than within species variation. The cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene has been designated as the barcode marker of choice for animals because it is easy to amplify through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, other genes have also been suggested as possible markers for DNA barcoding, particularly the ribosomal RNA genes such as the mitochondrial 16S rRNA. This study aimed to test the utility of COI and 16S rRNA genes on the Muricidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) and the Dicroglossidae (Chordata: Amphibia), two taxa based on the COI sequences in the GenBank database. For the Muricidae, a total of 1607 COI sequences and 552 16S rRNA sequences were mined from GenBank, and 505 bp of the COI and 445 bp of the 16S rRNA were evaluated. For the Dicroglossidae, 57 COI sequences and 410 16S rRNA sequences were used, and 558 bp of the COI 501 bp of the 16S rRNA were evaluated. Results showed that for the Muricidae, there was minimal overlap between intraspecific and interspecific variations in the COI, with most species being distinguished at 3% K2P genetic distance, whereas greater overlap was seen in the 16S rRNA, particularly at 0-2.5% interval. The COI is therefore more suitable as a DNA barcode marker at this time. For the Dicroglossidae, on the other hand, there was extensive overlap in the COI, whereas the 16S fared better where most species could be distinguished at 3% K2P genetic distance. Overlaps may be due to the presence of cryptic species or incomplete taxon sampling. It is recommended that DNA barcoding should rely on more than just one gene, but this will only be effective if the taxonomic group in question is well sampled. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 27, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Yield Simulation and Mapping Training under the RIICE Project  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, March 27, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    IFSA Seminar Series Nurturing Partnerships with NARES: some important lessons

    Mr. Julian A. Lapitan
    Consultant and Interim Head, Partnerships Office
    IFSA President 2002 :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, March 30, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    CESD Mini Symposium  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, March 31, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Special Seminar: PBGB Molecular breeding of temperate rice in Italy and Europe

    Dr. Pietro Piffanelli
    Rice Genomics
    Parco Tecnologico Padano
    Italy


    1400-1500H, Tuesday, 31 March 2015
    PBGB Conference Room 1

    Abstract
    The Rice Genomics Unit of Parco Tecnologico Padano (Italy) operates since 2006 with the specific aim to perform basic and applied research to address the needs of the rice supply chain in Europe.

    Italy is the main rice producing and exporting country in the EU with a cultivated area of 247.700 hectares and a production of 1.516.400 tons of paddy rice, equal to 46% of the total European production

    The development of innovative solutions is crucial to increase rice production, taking into account the current environmental conditions and resources available, for an improved and sustainable cultivation of temperate rice in Europe

    The general objective of the Rice Genomics Unit research activities is the characterisation and exploitation of European rice genetic resources of the temperate area, to enhance competitiveness in rice production, and alleviate biotic and abiotic constraints typical of the Mediterranean area.
    This goal is achievable by means of the acquisition, evaluation and conservation of international rice genetic resources, and identification of new genetic tools targeted at sustainable agricultural systems, with the most updated genomic tools.
    Our research activity has two major targets identification and conservation of genetic resources and identification of valuable sources of new genes and alleles for important traits to breeding programs of temperate rice :: IRRI Events

April, 2015
  • Monday, April 06, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    DA Management Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 07, 2015
    World Health Day  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 07, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    DA Management Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, April 08, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB Another story of the MADS box genes
    (especially focused on root development and functions)

    Dr. Sun-Hyung Kim
    Professor
    Plant Genetic Engineering Laboratory
    Department of Environmental Horticulture
    University of Seoul, South Korea


    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 08 April 2015
    Umali Room A


    Abstract

    MADS-box genes are key components of the networks that control the transition to flowering and flower development, but their role in vegetative development is poorly understood. This article shows that the sister gene of the AGAMOUS (AG) clade, AGL12, has an important role in root development as well as in flowering transition. Mutant allele for AGL12 isolated. agl12 mutant has a short-root phenotype with a smaller meristem, lower rate of cell production, and abnormal root apical meristem organization. Expression analyses confirmed the presence of AGL12 transcripts in roots, particularly in the phloem. Moreover, AGL12∷β-glucuronidase expression was specifically up-regulated by auxins in this tissue. In addition, mRNA in situ hybridization showed that AGL12 transcripts were also found in leaves and floral meristems of wild-type plants. This expression correlates with the late-flowering phenotypes of the xal1mutants grown under long days. Transcript expression analysis suggests that AGL12 is an upstream regulator of SOC, FLOWERING LOCUS T, and LFY. These results suggested that AGL12 may have similar roles in both root and aerial meristems that could explain the agl12 late-flowering phenotype. In this seminar, I also talk on the AGL14 and AGL19 that control the root development.
     :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 13, 2015 - Thursday, April 16, 2015
    Training Course on Designs and Analysis of Breeding Trials using PBTools The course will cover the following topics:

    1. Experimental Designs used in Breeding Trials
    2. Analysis of Single Environment Trials
    3. Analysis of Multi-Environment Trials
    4. Introduction to biplots

    The course will employ a combination of lecture and hands-on exercises using PBTools. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, April 13, 2015 - Friday, April 17, 2015
    ORYZA Training Program for Basic Applications  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 14, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD Drought adaptation, GxE and physiology

    John K. McKay
    Associate Professor
    Department of Bioagricultural Sciences
    Colorado State University
    U. S. A.
    Abstract: The long-term goal of my research is to provide detailed functional knowledge of mechanisms and mutations regulating genotype by environment interactions underlying drought responses, water use efficiency and the sensitivity of yield to drought. I will report on results of using natural variation in drought adaptation among diverse lines of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus. My research combines yield trials, high-throughput and detailed physiological screens in segregating families to understand physiological mechanisms with statistical and population genomics to identify causal polymorphisms underlying differences in drought adaptation.

    I will also discuss a collaborative grant proposal I am working on with IRRI, to apply some of these methods towards discovering mutations underlying GxE to drought in rice. :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 14, 2015 02:00pm - 04:00pm
    Meeting: Golden Rice  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 16, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    KSL activity with PhilRice  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 16, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    KSL Activity with PhilRice  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 16, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Flood-tolerant rice: where are we now?

    by:
    Endang M. Septiningsih
    Senior Scientist-Molecular Genetics
    Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology (PBGB)

    Abstract:

    Excess water can cause serious problems to the production of rice in areas that lack proper drainage, which leads to complete submergence after seeding and the vegetative stage, or stagnant flooding through to maturity and harvesting. Although widespread dissemination of the SUB1 QTL has had a profound impact by allowing rice crops to survive flash floods up to 2 or 3 weeks, greater submergence tolerance is needed in areas experiencing longer or more severe flood events.

    In her exit seminar, Dr. Septiningsih will describe her efforts, over the past 9 years at IRRI, in addressing the challenges of growing rice in flood-prone environments. She has recently identified novel QTLs complementary to SUB1 that show promise for more robust submergence tolerance. Likewise, significant progress has been made in identifying important QTLs for anaerobic germination and stagnant flooding tolerance, and promising breeding lines have been developed through conventional and molecular breeding approaches. Further investigation is needed for gene discovery, characterization, allele mining, and pyramiding at these important QTL targets to meet the challenges of the future.  :: IRRI Events

  • Sunday, April 19, 2015 - Thursday, April 23, 2015
    STRASA Annual Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 21, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Information Dissemination about the Staff Consultative Committee Elections  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 21, 2015 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    Information Dissemination about the Staff Consultative Committee Elections  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, April 22, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar:PBGB Molecular studies and breeding of high iron and zinc rice

    Dr. Jessica Rey
    Post Doctoral Fellow
    PBGB, IRRI

    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 22 April 2015
    Umali Room A :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 23, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Information Dissemination about the Staff Consultative Committee Elections  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 23, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar High-throughput SNP genotyping at IRRI

    by:
    Michael J. Thomson
    Senior Scientist-Molecular Genetics and Marker Applications
    Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology (PBGB)

    Abstract:

    Every so often, there come advances so far-reaching that they transform our approaches to doing science. Recently, we have experienced the convergence of three revolutions in the biological sciences: next-generation sequencing, information technology, and high-throughput genotyping techniques. Combined, these technologies present a tremendous opportunity for accelerating progress in genetic discovery and applications in plant breeding. By using automated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) systems, rapid and precise molecular marker genotyping is now routine.

    In his exit seminar, Dr. Thomson will describe the efforts of the service and research teams in the Genotyping Services Laboratory to implement high-throughput SNP genotyping at IRRI and leverage the latest tools and data sets to validate predictive SNP markers for the breeding programs. While SNP genotyping has successfully accelerated discovery research at IRRI, more work is needed to deploy low-cost SNP markers on a large scale across the forward breeding programs. Dr. Thomson will also discuss recent initiatives to integrate SNP analysis pipelines, databases, and breeding data management tools to enable rapid analysis of industrial-scale genotyping across IRRI’s breeding programs for more effective marker-assisted selection. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 23, 2015 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    Information Dissemination about the Staff Consultative Committee Elections  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, April 28, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: CESD Evaluation of the APSIM model in cropping systems of Asia


    Donald Gaydon
    Senior Research Scientist
    CSIRO Agriculture Flagship
    Brisbane, Australia

    Abstract. Climatic, institutional and social changes in many rice-growing regions of Asia are among challenges to increase food production whilst ensuring environmental sustainability. In this seminar, modelling studies using cropping systems model, the Agricultural Production Simulator (APSIM) are presented. The model ability to capture interactions between soil water and nutrient dynamics, crop growth, climate and farmer management was evaluated for cropping systems in Asia. The model performed well in simulating the diversity of cropping systems, with particular strengths in simulation of multi-crop sequences and specification of realistic dynamics in farmer management practices. Promising results were also obtained in using the model in combination with field experiments to identify water management strategies which could alleviate salt stress and improve water productivity for coastal zones.  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, April 29, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB 40 years of rice seed exchange through INGER
    + How rice varieties got their names

    Dr. Glenn Gregorio
    Senior Scientist II - Plant Breeder
    Deputy Division Head
    PBGB, IRRI

    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 29 April 2015
    Umali Room A :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, April 30, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar GRiSP monitoring and evaluation system for results based management: Progress and future plans

    by:
    Hope Webber
    Senior Scientist - Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist
    Social Sciences Division (SSD)

    Abstract:

    A robust monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system is needed to be able to manage GRiSP programs for impact in rice research and development. The objectives of the GRiSP M&E system are to develop methods and tools for collecting data to track the performance of research milestones and output (product) indicators, and periodically evaluate intermediate outcomes (IDOs) and impact. GRiSP started developing this results-based M&E system in 2011. Achievements have been made in the area of developing the CRP impact pathways and theory of change, results framework, intermediate development outcomes/indicators, and a tool for managing milestones. In this seminar, we will present and discuss the progress made so far in improving the M&E results framework; activities undertaken under the national rice research and development strategies (NRDS) in Asia, Latin America, and Africa; progress and preliminary results in the action sites according to the baseline farm household surveys conducted by IRRI, CIAT, and AfricaRice; and progress on the development of a management information system for managing M&E data and future M&E activities in the pipeline. :: IRRI Events

May, 2015
  • Monday, May 04, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    FSSP team leaders meeting Purpose: Introduction of Dr. Donna Casimero as research coordinator for IRRI activities in the Philippines and to discuss possible options for multiple year contract for FSSP project hired NRS. Please check first availability of Bruce and Donna before sending the invite. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, May 04, 2015 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    Director General's Meeting with All IRRI Staff  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, May 06, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    candidate seminar: Senior Scientist II - Gender Specialist position Gender Analysis in Agriculture: Examples from Malawi and Uganda

    By Dr. Monica Fisher
    Candidate for Senior Scientist II, Gender Specialist (Headquarters)

    ​​​​​​Wednesday, 6 May 2015 I 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM I Seminar Room, Harrar Hall
     :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, May 06, 2015 04:00pm - 06:00pm
    IFSA Harvest Run  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 07, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    Candidate Seminar: Finance Controller position  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 07, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    International Food and Bake Sale c/o IRRI Spouses and Partners  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 07, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    IRRI-SKEP II Syngenta Review Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 07, 2015 09:00am - 05:00pm
    Golden Rice Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, May 08, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    IRRI-SKEP II Syngenta Review Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, May 11, 2015 - Friday, May 15, 2015
    2nd Annual CORIGAP Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, May 11, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    GSR Phase II Asia Review  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, May 11, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Seminar: SSD Rural Livelihood Diversification in Rice-based Areas of Bangladesh

    Md Tanvir Ahmed
    MS Research Scholar
    International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)
    Los Banos, Laguna, Philippine

    MSc Student (Agricultural Economics)
    University of Philippine Los Banos (UPLB)

    Young Professional (in study leave)
    Agriculture and Food Security Program
    BRAC, Bangladesh

    Abstract
    Diversification of livelihood activities minimizes households’ vulnerability to shocks by reducing income variability. Livelihood of rural Bangladesh encompasses farm, off-farm and non-farm activities. This study investigated the patterns and extent of diversification of livelihoods in rural Bangladesh. It also identified the major factors affecting livelihood diversification. The study drew a random sample of 500 rural farm households in Bangladesh through a multi-stage sampling technique. The primary data were collected using semi-structured questionnaires and the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Simpson Index. Tobit regression model was used to determine the factors affecting the livelihood diversification. The results showed that farm-income accounted for one-third while non-farm income accounted for two-thirds of the total household income. Remittance contributed highest to the household income followed by business and caste occupation and rice farming. The estimated Simpson Index showed that rural Bangladeshi households have diversified their livelihood activities at medium level. Households from South-Eastern region had highest level of livelihood diversification than other regions. The small and medium landholding households are more likely to diversify their livelihoods compared to the functionally landless and large landholding households. Gender of the household head, household size and amount of credit had positive and significant effects on livelihood diversification. While number of migrant household members, dependency ratio, household assets, education of the household head and amount of savings had negative but significant effects on livelihood diversification. The implication is that non-farm employment opportunities should be expanded to combat poor households’ vulnerability to shocks and income fluctuations. Functionally landless households should be given more attention to increase and diversify their incomes. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, May 11, 2015 03:00pm - 05:00pm
    GRS Spouse/Partner Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 09:00am - 04:00pm
    IRRI-PSFI Pre-implementation Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, May 13, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    IRRI and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) Academy for Global Engagement Lecture Series  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 14, 2015 08:30am - 09:30am
    Candidate Seminar: Finance Controller position  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 14, 2015 03:00pm - 09:00pm
    Treasures of Art and Rice (The IRRI Manansala Murals and Philippine Heirloom Rice)  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    2015 RMQA Workshop/ Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Joint Seminar: CESD and SSD Economic, social and environmental sustainability assessment of mechanisation in rice harvesting

    Brechje Maréchal
    Environmental Sustainability Specialist
    Crop and Environmental Sciences Division
    IRRI

    Abstract: The increasing trend of mechanisation in rice farming is driven by the need to produce more food more efficiently. A change to mechanisation will have economic, social and environmental impacts that need to be assessed before such changes can be promoted and adopted as a sustainable solution. The impact of mechanised rice harvesting has been considered within the context of the Sustainable Rice Platform and the CORIGAP projects. A comprehensive literature and methodology reviews were undertaken to outline how economic, environmental and social factors related to harvesting rice can be assessed in an integrated way.

    The aim is to develop a way to assess the effect of mechanisation on the sustainability of the rice value chain. It is argued that this kind of integrated assessment should be part of the research and development processes to assess whether changes in agriculture, that have shown positive results in experiments, will also contribute to actual improvements in the life of rice farmers.

    The presentation summarises the findings of the literature and methodology reviews and outlines the next steps towards finalizing a sustainability assessment framework. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - Friday, May 22, 2015
    CURE Review and Planning and Steering Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 09:00am - 12:00pm
    Visit/ Orientation for DA-BAR's Finance Group  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 21, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Mega-Trends for IRRI in Bangladesh


    by:
    Paul N. Fox
    Senior Scientist II
    IRRI Representative for Bangladesh


    Abstract:

    Through a convergence of donor priorities for Bangladesh, IRRI will be involved in a radical restructuring of the rice breeding methodology for both the public and private sector. This goal is both donor-driven and congruent with IRRI's mandate. The activities that will be involved also mesh with my previous track record in public and private breeding.

    In the future, the revitalization of plant breeding—with emphasis beyond major genes—could become a cutting-edge opportunity for IRRI in Asia, if mature and well-supported breeding software can underpin targeted breeding transformations.

    IRRI Bangladesh will also migrate from basic agronomic extension—and related research into development processes— towards targeting the rice value chain, with emphasis on the milling industry and harnessing other private sector initiatives for the benefit of rural farming communities. Farmers will increasingly respond to the demands of emerging markets. I will discuss the application of some R&D lessons learned with maize in Indonesia to rice-based systems in Bangladesh and how we can stimulate food processing and packaging operations nearer to the sources of production. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, May 22, 2015
    International Day for Biological Diversity  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, May 22, 2015 02:00pm - 04:00pm
    GR Monthly Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, May 25, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: IRRI Korea Representative position Next​ ​​Generation ​Crop ​Improvement: ​A ​Vision for ​Leading ​Temperate ​Rice ​Research into the ​Future and the ​Role of the IRRI-Korea ​Collaboration

    ​​By ​​Candidates for IRRI Korea Representative (South Korea)

    ​​Monday, 25 May 2015 | Board Room, FF Hill Building
    Dr. Tika Adhikari (9:00 AM - 10:00 AM)
    Dr. Changrong Ye (2:00 PM - 3:00 PM) :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, May 25, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Candidate Seminar: IRRI Korea Representative position Next​ ​​Generation ​Crop ​Improvement: ​A ​Vision for ​Leading ​Temperate ​Rice ​Research into the ​Future and the ​Role of the IRRI-Korea ​Collaboration

    ​​By ​​Candidates for IRRI Korea Representative (South Korea)

    ​​Monday, 25 May 2015 | Board Room, FF Hill Building
    Dr. Tika Adhikari (9:00 AM - 10:00 AM)
    Dr. Changrong Ye (2:00 PM - 3:00 PM) :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, May 26, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Seminar: SSD Innovations for climate risk management in rice production systems in South Asia


    Dr. David J. Spielman
    Sr. Research Fellow
    IFPRI - USA

    and

    Dr. Patrick S. Ward
    Research Fellow
    IFPRI - India


    Abstract: Climate change has the potential to seriously impact rice production throughout South Asia, most especially in rainfed rice production systems. While climate change is certainly expected to affect weather normals, perhaps the greatest risks arise from changes in the frequency of what are presently climate extremes. The two greatest extreme events that threaten future rice production are droughts and floods. Recent efforts to develop rice cultivars with characteristics tolerant to these stresses have resulted in the release of several varieties that demonstrate significant resilience to droughts and floods. But these varieties may ultimately prove to be of little value unless they are actually adopted by farmers in these risk-prone ecologies. Additionally, while these technological innovations may provide yield benefits relative to non-tolerant varieties, the yield benefits are both non-absolute as well as stochastic, implying residual risks not addressed directly by the varieties. In this seminar, IFPRI researchers David J. Spielman and Patrick S. Ward will present some of the results of their research program coordinated under the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA). Their results provide insight into the heterogeneous nature of demand for stress-tolerant rice cultivars and hybrids, with conclusions suggesting pathways by which rice seed markets can be segmented along various dimensions. They also provide insight into how the risk-reducing benefits of these stress-tolerant varieties can be bundled with complementary risk management tools to provide near-comprehensive protection, particularly against drought risk.  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, May 27, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB PBGB-GRC Joint Seminar


    Enabling knowledge management in the Agronomic Domain

    Dr. Pierre Larmande
    Head, Data Integration Group
    Institute of Computational Biology
    DIADE, IRD
    Montpellier, France

    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 27 May 2015
    Umali Room A

    Abstract

    The drastic growth in data in the recent years, within the Agronomic sciences has brought the concept of knowledge management to the forefront. Some of the factors that contribute to this change include a) conducting high-throughput experiments have become affordable, the time spent in generating data through these experiments are minuscule when compared to its integration and analysis; b) publishing data over the web is fairly trivial and c) multiple databases exist for each type of data (i.e. ‘omics’ data) with a possible overlap or slight variation in its coverage [1, 2]. In most cases these sources remain autonomous and disconnected. Hence, efficiently managed data and the underlying knowledge in principle will make data analysis straightforward aiding in more efficient decision making. We are involved in developing methods to aid data integration and knowledge management within the domain of Agronomic sciences to improve information accessibility and interoperability. To this end, we address the challenge by pursuing several complementary research directions towards: distributed, heterogeneous data integration. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, May 28, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Complexity, tradeoffs, and bias: Evaluating the impact of "new" agronomy and "old" extension systems and its implications for rice science


    by:
    David J. Spielman
    Senior Research Fellow
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Washington, DC-USA

    Abstract:

    Many recent sustainable intensification initiatives for developing-country agriculture are promoting a range of complex, systems-based agronomic innovations designed to assist smallholders to simultaneously improve yields, reduce production costs, and conserve natural resources. Some of these include zero-tillage cultivation, integrated pest and soil fertility management, and systems of crop intensification, among others. Many efforts to promote these initiatives have gone to scale in recent years, relying only on limited agronomic data collected from experiment stations and farmer-managed trials. Only a few are being scaled-up based on evidence from experimental data collected under farmers’ conditions, which measure outcomes such as farm profitability or household welfare, or the heterogeneity in these outcomes across different types of individuals, households, and communities. Even fewer have been scaled-up with a sense of the efficacy of alternative extension approaches in promoting learning and adoption among targeted smallholders.

    This presentation explores these issues across three specific dimensions. First, it characterizes the complex nature of these innovations, their tradeoffs, and limitations in terms of improving prospects for sustainable intensification, climate change adaptation, and welfare improvement. Second, it examines how these innovations challenge traditional extension systems, social learning dynamics, and other mechanisms through which farmers learn, experiment, and adopt. Third, it discusses challenges posed by weak counterfactuals and sample selection bias in the evaluation of farm- and household-level impacts. The presentation will, in turn, encourage participants to consider ways to strengthen the evidence based on new agronomy for global rice science—where “new” agronomy works, for whom, and under what circumstances. :: IRRI Events

June, 2015
  • Monday, June 01, 2015 09:30am - 11:30am
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, June 01, 2015 02:00pm - 04:00pm
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 03, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Climate Smart Agriculture Workshop c/o Val Pede, Tri Setiyono, & Michael Sheinkman  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 03, 2015 09:30am - 11:30am
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 03, 2015 02:00pm - 04:00pm
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 04, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Amphibians as providers of ecosystem services to promote safe, sustainable, and intensified agricultural rice production


    by:
    Catherine Propper
    Professor, Department of Biological Sciences
    Northern Arizona University
    Arizona, USA


    Abstract:

    Rice agriculture supplies a fundamental food crop to over half of the world’s population; however, these systems in particular are susceptible to causing environmental degradation. On the other hand, rice plots provide wetland and complex habitats with the potential to support biodiversity, which may lead to sustainable rice production. Identifying ecologically-based management paradigms to provide enhanced rice productivity while simultaneously obtaining ecosystem services from wildlife, could lead to improved human and environmental health.

    Amphibians are one of the most endangered groups of animals on earth, yet we only are beginning to understand how they provide ecosystem services both in natural and in agricultural settings. Current agricultural pesticide-use practices affect amphibian development and survival through overt toxicity and endocrine disruption of their key physiological functions, such as growth and reproduction. Pesticide exposures, therefore, may reduce or eliminate amphibians’ capacity to support ecosystem services for human populations.

    In this seminar, we will be testing the hypothesis that reduced pesticide use will improve amphibians’ capacity to support both human and ecosystem health. Our specific goals are to determine whether amphibians are: (1) acting as biomonitors for negative human health outcomes following pesticide exposure; (2) feeding on rice pests and insect disease vectors; (3) providing food and economic resources for rural farmers; (4) providing fertilizer; and, most critically, (5) increasing rice yield. The aim of our project in the long-term is to disseminate management practices that promote sustainability and health of rice agriculture while gaining multiple benefits for both human populations and one of the most endangered groups of animals on the planet.
     :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, June 05, 2015
    World Environment Day  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, June 05, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Food Safety Risk Communication Training For ASEAN-Plus Three National Food Authorities (Day 3)  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, June 08, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Inception and Planning Workshop of USAID-funded Project: Accelerating the Adoption of Stress-Tolerant Rice Varieties by Smallholder Farmers in Nepal and Cambodia  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, June 08, 2015 09:30am - 11:30am
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, June 08, 2015 02:00pm - 04:00pm
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, June 09, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Inception and Planning Workshop of USAID-funded Project: Accelerating the Adoption of Stress-Tolerant Rice Varieties by Smallholder Farmers in Nepal and Cambodia  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 10, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 11, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 11, 2015 08:00am - 09:00am
    Philippine Independence Day Celebration  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 11, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Stress-response genetic network in rice: Hierarchy, epistasis, epialleles, and transgressive phenotypes


    by:
    Benildo G. de los Reyes
    Professor of Molecular Genetics
    School of Biology and Ecology
    University of Maine, USA


    Abstract:

    Innovative strategies in breeding the next generation of climate-resilient crops will have to be implemented to ensure the world’s food supply amidst burgeoning threats of extreme weather conditions, decreasing arable land and water resources, and rapid population growth. Radical research paradigms are needed to create novel plant attributes that have not yet been achieved in order to substantially enhance genetic potential under marginal environments. This goes beyond what has already been achieved in the first Green Revolution and in subsequent genomics-enabled breeding strategies. How can this enormous goal be attained? Can we push the limits further? Are conventional strategies of marker-assisted introgression and genetic manipulation by transgenesis sufficient?

    Any further improvements in the genetic potential of crops will have to rely on the ability to create complex genomic configurations that could lead to novel biochemical and physiological attributes. While the answer to the “9-billion people question (9BPQ)” may be quite overwhelming, if not mind-boggling, a possible component of the solution to the puzzle may be evident from conventional wisdom in plant genetics. This is if we are to boldly reexamine those concepts within the context of recent paradigm shifts in network biology and epigenetics, hence, a new approach to a classical question. Within the context of the 9BPQ, this seminar will present a more contemporary view of the enigmatic phenomenon of transgressive variation by interfacing the classical concepts of Mendelian genetics with these paradigm shifts in network biology and epigenetic regulation.. Transgressive segregation is observed when traits of progenies derived from two divergent parents are either superior or inferior to both parents. Using a tractable genetic model such as rice, we are making incremental advances in addressing the hypothesis that transgressive traits for stress tolerance are due to ideal complementation effects when different portions of DNA and/or RNA from both parents are brought together in the same genetic background through genome shuffling, which leads to reconfigured gene expression networks and novel phenotypes. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, June 12, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, June 15, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, June 16, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 17, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 18, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, June 19, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, June 23, 2015 08:30am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Scientist - Sensory Profiling position  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, June 23, 2015 09:30am - 11:30am
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, June 24, 2015 08:30am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Scientist - Sensory Profiling position  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, June 25, 2015 09:30am - 11:30am
    information sessions on the new medical insurance of HQ NRS  :: IRRI Events

July, 2015
  • Wednesday, July 08, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Employee Assistance Program  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 08, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    Dr. EE Su Fang, ScienceVision, Malaysia endorsed by Dr. Henry

    July 7, Tuesday
    1420H Arrival via flight Z2 949
    1620H Check-in at IRRI Dormitory

    July 8, Wednesday
    0900-0910H Welcome and screening of IRRI video
    0910-0930H Tour of the museum
    0940-1040H Meeting/discussion with Dr. Inez on biotechnology works
    1040-1140H Visit to GTL and transgenic facilities
    1150-1300H Lunch break
    1310-1410H Meeting/discussion on molecular biology (Dr. Tobias)
    1410-1510H Visit to GSL facilities
    1520H Back to IRRI Dormitory

    July 9, Thursday
    0900-1000H Visit to TC and meeting/discussion on Postdoctoral fellowship
    1010-1110H Meeting/discussion on Young Scientists in IRRI (Dr. Henry)
    1120-1200H Lunch break
    1200-onwards Free time

    July 10, Friday
    Free day/campus tour to UPLB

    July 11, Saturday
    1300H Check-out from IRRI Dorm/Proceed to the airport
    1705H Departure via flight Z2 940 :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, July 09, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Employee Assistance Program  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, July 09, 2015 05:30pm - 07:00pm
    PA system_PALAY-ISIPAN (Quiz Contest) c/o IFSA  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, July 10, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Employee Assistance Program  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 15, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    IRRI and PSFI MOA Signing (NextGen Project)  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 15, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    Collaborative Meeting between Oscar M. Lopez Foundation (OML) and IRRI for the Implementation of the NextGen Project  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 22, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB Identification and molecular analysis of a novel resistance gene for brown planthopper biotype of India


    Prahalada, G.D.
    PhD Research Scholar/GRiSS Scholar
    PBGB, IRRI


    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 22 July 2015
    Umali Room A

    Abstract

    The brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens (Stal.) is one of the most destructive monophagous insect pest of rice. Host-plant resistance has proven to be one of the most efficient strategies to manage the BPH. CR 2711-76 is a BPH resistant indica variety developed at Central Rice Research Institute (CRRI), India. Bioassay studies from 2011 to 2014 at India, and International Rie Research Institute (IRRI) showed that, CR 2711-76 is a stable (durable) and broad spectrum resistant cultivar. A dominant gene present in CR 2711-76, conferring BPH resistance was located on the long arm of the chromosome 3 and physically mapped in the interval of 475kb between the markers PA26 and RM2334 and was named as BPH31. The BPH31 in CR 2711-76 has all three kinds of of resistance mechanism such as antibiosis, antixenosis and tolerance. The BPH31 gene was introgressed into the indica variety Jaya through Marker Assisted Selection (MAS). In this seminar, I will be presenting the primary mapping, fine mapping, BPH31 and the MAS to develop improved version of Indian elite cultivar.  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, July 22, 2015 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    Rice Culture of the Cordilleras: Photo exhibit by Mr. David Leprozo, Jr.  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, July 24, 2015 08:00am - 11:30am
    Heirloom Rice Project Activity (Grain Selection)  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, July 30, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar A personal take on conventional breeding of Milyang



    by:
    Un-Sang Yeo
    Senior Scientist-Seconded from RDA, Korea
    Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology (PBGB)



    Abstract:

    Rice breeding in Korea has dynamically changed and has synchronized well with IRRI’s. At the advent of the 2000’s, the priority of rice breeding in Korea rapidly changed from quantity to quality.

    Since the paper declaring the first construction of the rice DNA map was published in 1989, many agronomically important genes were identified on 12 rice chromosomes. Nowadays, pyramiding of genes backcrossed to template varieties has become a major trend in many rice breeding projects such as Green Super Rice. However, template varieties in some countries or communities are still under development through conventional breeding. It will be ideal to use molecular and conventional approaches together. Another improved variety is expected to be released soon from the GUVA project’s tropical japonica breeding. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, July 31, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    SSD Seminar Remote sensing and crop growth model applications for irrigation management and crop yield monitoring



    Mr. Mojtaba Rezaei
    PhD Student
    Sari University of Agriculture Science and Natural Resource
    IRAN

    Social Sciences Division



    ABSTRACT:
    Water availability is a major threat to sustainable rice production in many parts of the world. A system analysis using crop growth simulation (CGM) model is needed to efficiently evaluate different solutions for different environment in the face of water scarcity. Another useful application of CGM is to provide early estimation of rice production. It is believed that crop growth model (CGM) can be reliable tool to predict crop yield as well as understand and mitigate the effects of new and somehow unknown situation. Despite reasonable accuracy of yield simulations with CGMs in small scales, there are still difficulties in applying CGMs in large scale especially for estimation of rice yield loss due to water shortage. This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of enhancing accuracy of CERES-Rice and ORYZA CGMs in estimating yield at large-scale through the use of MODIS, Landsat 5, and Landsat 7 satellite imageries in Guilan, Iran and Nueva Ecija, Philippines. For study case in Iran, CGM was further applied to find the best irrigation solutions in the face of an on-going water shortage condition in the area. The results in Iran showed high accuracy in yield prediction in small-scale field experiments for calibration and validation of CERES-Rice (RMSEn=8%). Accuracy of yield prediction over large area was improved by assimilation of remote sensing data. Without assimilation of Landsat 5 and Landsat 7, RMSEn for yield estimation was 21% whereas with assimilation of remote sensing data the RMSEn was 12%. The average yield loss in the area are simulated to be 36, 20, 10, and 2% in the case of 250, 300, 350 and 400mm of water application scenarios as compared to fully irrigated condition with 500 mm water application during crop season. In the case of Nueva Ecija, Philippines, MODIS data assimilation resulted in reduction of RMSEn from 38% to 23%, indicating high prospect of such remote sensing data assimilation approach for application of CGM in crop yield monitoring. :: IRRI Events

August, 2015
  • Tuesday, August 04, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Meeting: Syngenta  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 05, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    Meeting: Syngenta  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 06, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar A strategy for mitigating heat-induced spikelet sterility at flowering in rice with the early-morning flowering trait



    by:

    Tsutomu Ishimaru
    Senior Scientist-Plant Breeder
    IRRI-Japan Collaborative Research Project
    Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology (PBGB)



    Abstract:

    The recent trend in temperature increase is predicted to have negative effects on crop productivity. Climate is expected to become more variable with frequent episodes of stressful temperatures coinciding with critical crop developmental stages such as flowering. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is very susceptible to heat stress at the flowering stage, thus, heat-induced spikelet sterility (HISS) at flowering would be one of the serious threats to rice production in the near future.

    The early-morning flowering (EMF) trait is effective against heat stress at flowering as it shifts flower opening time (FOT) to the early morning when it’s cooler. There is a very small variation in FOT among current varieties, whereas there is a wide variation among wild rice species. By using the wide variation in FOT among wild rice, an attempt was made to exploit the EMF locus from wild rice, Oryza officinalis (CC genome). Genetic studies and breeding efforts have been connected with the development of near-isogenic lines (NILs) carrying a QTL for EMF. Furthermore, the EMF study is currently being extended to the combined stress of heat and drought. The hotspots for HISS at flowering were identified through a field survey in the potential vulnerable regions of Laos and southern India. The comprehensive challenges, genetics, breeding, agronomy, and physiology in EMF to mitigate HISS at flowering will be presented. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, August 10, 2015 01:30pm - 03:30pm
    Workshop for Software Developers In partnership with UX Manila, PBGB-BIM will be hosting a workshop for software developers coming from PBGB, CESD, and SSD.
    This will be held on August 10, 2015 from 1:30 P.M to 3:30 P.M at the PBGB Conference Room 1.

    A group from UX Manila will be coming to IRRI to act as resource persons. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 12, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Joint Seminars: CESD and SSD Measuring Change in an Evolving Landscape: Development of Community
    Based-Indicators for the IRRI-DA-PhilRice Heirloom Rice Project
    in Ifugao and Mountain Province, Philippines



    Adrien Salazar
    Masters in Environmental Management 2016 Candidate
    Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
    New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A.


    Abstract: The Cordillera Rice Terraces of the northern Philippines, managed for generations by indigenous communities, face numerous forces that have transformed the landscape and terrace rice production. Today, farmers cope with a host of stressors including pests and disease, degraded infrastructures, terrace damage, and reduced availability of human labor. The IRRI-DA-PhilRice Heirloom Rice Project (HRP) launched in 2014 with the intent to characterize and conserve heirloom rice varieties, improve farmer organizational capacity and entrepreneurship, and develop markets for these distinct rice varieties. This current study conducted semi-structured interviews with project staff, partners, and heirloom rice farmers in two sites—Hungduan, Ifugao and Barlig, Mountain Province—to determine how HRP participants perceived the social, cultural, economic, and environmental functions of heirloom rice. A set of indicators was derived from these interviews and validated via a participatory Community-Based Indicator workshop. Target beneficiaries (heirloom rice farmers) scored 53 indicators on 3 criteria as well as for overall usefulness. These scores reveal indicators of change in rice production most relevant to the farmers that can be incorporated in participatory monitoring and evaluation systems for the Heirloom Rice Project. This study suggests that rural Cordillera communities like Hapao and Barlig are undergoing significant changes that influence 1) the socio-cultural, economic, and environmental roles of native rice varieties in these communities and 2) farmer receptivity to interventions like the Heirloom Rice Project. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 12, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: Why OCS Is Ugly?  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 13, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    LI-COR Instrument Clinic hosted by PHILAB  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 13, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar From stress physiology to technology development in the rainfed lowlands of Southeast Asia



    by:

    Y​oichiro Kato​​
    Scientist​ II​-​Rainfed Lowland Agronomist for Southeast Asia
    ​​Crop and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD)



    Abstract:

    The rainfed rice ecosystem spreads 55 million hectares in South and Southeast Asia, where rice growth is often hampered by water problems (drought and floods). In many cases, other problems related to soil and water, such as salinity and nutrient disorder, accompany them. Fortunately, breeders from IRRI and NARES have already developed a series of stress-tolerant rice varieties and have disseminated them to farmers’ fields. One of our challenges now is to make full use of these materials.

    However, as experts themselves, Asian farmers already have an independent opinion on how they could make their crops adapt better to stress-prone environments. They are the ones to give a final review of any "innovative" option, and ready-made recommendations may not often work. In this seminar, I will briefly introduce how we've tried to address these issues in the Rainfed Lowland Agronomy team for the last two years, seeking for both basic understanding of and interaction with farmers.
     :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, August 14, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    LI-COR Seminar/Workshop hosted by PHILAB  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, August 14, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    AFSTRI Food Fest  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, August 17, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    candidate seminar: PBGB Head  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 18, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    candidate seminar: PBGB Head  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 18, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    candidate seminar: PBGB Head  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 18, 2015 11:00am - 01:00pm
    Communication Lunch Seminar on Nutritional Status and Food Consumption of Filipinos: Results of the 2013 National Nutrition Survey  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 18, 2015 01:30pm - 04:00pm
    ​"Meet and Greet" with PPS Suppliers & Contractors  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 19, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Bayer GM Stewardship Workshop c/o MM  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, August 19, 2015 01:00pm - 04:00pm
    MedTest (Life Technologies) Seminar c/o PBGB and SCS  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 20, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    candidate seminar: PBGB Head  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 20, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    candidate seminar: PBGB Head  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 20, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Distribution and Impact of Stress-Tolerant Rice Varieties in South AsiA



    by:

    ​Takashi Yamano​​
    Senior Scientist-​Impact Assessment Specialist
    Social Sciences Division (SSD)



    Abstract:

    ​​The presentation summarizes recent adoption and impact assessment studies on stress-tolerant rice varieties in South Asia, more specifically focusing on their dissemination in Eastern India and Bangladesh. Area estimates of stress-tolerant rice and other varieties based on the 2014 survey of more than 7,000 households in Bangladesh and India will be presented. Farmers' sequential use of Swarna-Sub1 over two years, rice variety replacement behavior and preference on all varieties, and awareness and past use of stress-tolerant rice and other varieties will also be discussed.  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, August 25, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Research Leaders Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, August 27, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar  :: IRRI Events

September, 2015
  • Tuesday, September 01, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Fishbase Symposium and Exhibit  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 02, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Fishbase Symposium and Exhibit  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 02, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB Genomic and open-source breeding informatics initiative


    Kelly R. Robbins
    Director
    Genomics and Open-Source Breeding Informatics Initiative (GOBII)
    Cornell University
    Ithaca, NY, USA


    1400-1500H, Wednesday, 02 September 2015
    Umali Room A

    Abstract

    The presentation will provide a brief review of genomic selection (GS), provide insights into GS strategies, and discuss some key lessons learned implementing GS in a large industrial breeding program. Discussions on GS will be followed up with an introduction to the Genomics & Open-Source Breeding Informatics initiative (GOBII) with discussion on strategies for early stage development of the GOBII system and a high-level presentation of the proposed system architecture.
     :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, September 03, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Changes in rice farming in the Philippines: Insights from five decades of the Central Luzon Loop Survey​


    by:

    ​​Kei Kajisa​​
    ​Professor​ - Aoyama Gakuin University
    ​T​okyo​-Japan​


    Abstract:

    ​​​The Central Luzon Loop Survey, started by IRRI in 1966 on the eve of the Green Revolution, is perhaps the longest continuous survey in rice farming and of rice farm families in existence. The dataset is suitable for documenting long-term stru​​ctural changes and drawing lessons for the future. Topics covered by this seminar will include the (1) lack of successors and aging of farm families, (2) progress of mechanization and outsourcing, (3) history of varietal adoption, (4) emerging problems in wet-season rice farming, (5) possible recurrence of insecticide use, and (6) changes in the beneficiaries of the Green Revolution. Future research agendas will also be discussed. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, September 04, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    CCARA Final Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, September 04, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    CCARA Kick Off Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, September 07, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Special Seminar Dietary fibre and human health - Potential applications for rice​

    by:

    ​​David Topping​​
    ​CSIRO Food and Nutrition
    ​​Adelaide, Australia​ :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 08, 2015 11:00am - 01:00pm
    IRRI-UPLB Joint Management Committee Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 08, 2015 03:00pm - 04:00pm
    Meeting: PBGB GRS staff  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, September 11, 2015 01:00pm - 04:00pm
    ES Meeting with Staff  :: IRRI Events

  • Saturday, September 12, 2015 08:00am - 02:00pm
    Visit of the ASEAN Ministers of Agriculture and Forestry (AMAF) Plus Three (China, Japan, Korea), and India  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 16, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
    Seminar: SSD SSD Division Seminar

    Wednesday, 16 September 2015
    10:00-11:00 AM
    SSD Conference Room, Drilon Building



    “Economics of shorter breeding cycles in rice breeding”


    Mr. Bert Lenaerts
    MSC Student at University of Leuven


    Social Sciences Division



    ABSTRACT:
    This research has been conducted in the framework of an MSc thesis at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Rapid Generation Advance (RGA) is a breeding method that allows breeders to shorten the breeding cycle by growing more plants on a small area in a screenhouse. The shift from the widespread pedigree method to RGA delivers benefits both from a cost reduction as well as from an earlier release of varieties. So the first objective is to quantify these costs and benefits. Costs are studied based on the breeding programs currently conducted at IRRI; benefits are estimated using a meta-analysis of rice breeding impact studies, mainly from Asia. Secondly, this MSc thesis aims at eliciting the willingness to adopt RGA by NARS breeders across different countries and providing an overview of breeding methods currently used by them. To achieve this, a comprehensive online survey will be conducted across different rice breeding institutes worldwide. These two aims can be combined to study the ex-ante benefits, costs and constraints and describe the process of adoption of RGA by NARS breeders. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 16, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    Seminar: PBGB  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, September 18, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
    Meeting: Rice RDE Projects Review and Planning Workshop Dear FSSP team,

    Before we go for the review, may I suggest that we have a coordination meeting to discuss the preparations and other concerns that we need to raise to BAR and DA, if there are.

    May I suggest that we meet either on Sept 17 or 18, at 10 am. Ugnayan Meeting Room, FF Hill.

    Thanks and hope to see you at the meeting.

    Warm regards,

    Donna


    On Wed, Sep 9, 2015 at 9:12 AM, Jocelyn Amarante (IRRI) <> wrote:
    Dear FSSP Project leaders,

    Please find attached the revised invitation and program for the BAR - Review/ Planning workshop on 1-2 October, 2015 at Quezon City. Kindly provide us the names of the staff attending for your project by tomorrow, Thursday (Aug10), so we could relay to BAR.

    Also, a gentle reminder on the Powerpoint presentations, for all ongoing projects kindly use the "Progress" template, otherwise please use the "Completion" template. We would also need to provide the M&E form to BAR. BAR expects 1 powerpoint per project - kindly ensure you have discussed with your PhilRice counterparts. For the M&E form, this will be separate for IRRI and PhilRice.

    As previously advised, kindly send to DRPC these two documents (Powerpoint and M&E) on/before 22-September for compilation, and sending to BAR.

    Thanks and regards,
    Joy
     :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, September 21, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    Candidate Seminar: Head of Partnerships position  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 22, 2015 10:00am - 12:00pm
    Seminar on Biotechnology  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, September 24, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar The Explosion of Rice Bioinformatics


    by:

    ​​​Nickolai Alexandrov
    Senior Scientist
    T.T. Chang Genetic Resources Center (TTCGRC​)​



    Abstract:

    ​​​Rice bioinformatics exploded when the 3,000 rice genome sequencing project was completed last year. An unprecedented amount of sequence data required immediate attention—it had to be reliably stored, carefully quality-controlled, properly organized in data structures, and thoroughly analyzed. Not everything went smoothly and there were unexpected delays and a few mistakes. Nevertheless, the main results from this project have been made available to the rice community via a friendly and interactive web portal.

    How does this data help breeders and other rice scientists in their work? What have we achieved and what new discoveries should we expect in the near future? How should we be prepared to meet new challenges in rice bioinformatics? More questions will be discussed and some of them will be answered in this seminar. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, September 28, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    IRRI Breeders' Week Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, September 28, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Publishing with Impact (Dr. Camilla Myers - Facilitator)  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 29, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    IRRI Breeders' Week Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 29, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Publishing with Impact (Dr. Camilla Myers - Facilitator)  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, September 29, 2015 03:00pm - 04:30pm
    IRRI Joint OHS Committee Meeting Dear OHS Committee Members,

    Kindly free-up your schedules and confirm attendance for the next IRRI Joint OHS Committee Meeting on 29 September 2015, 3-4:30 PM (PHT) at the Board Room, FFHill.

    A separate Webex invite would be sent to Country Office CSMs & Representatives.

    See attached minutes of the last meeting and agenda as reference.

    Thank you.

    Jose :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 30, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    IRRI Breeders' Week Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, September 30, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Writing Proposals (Dr. Camilla Myers - Facilitator)  :: IRRI Events

October, 2015
  • Thursday, October 01, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Open Day for PDFs (with Dr. Grant Singleton & Dr. Camilla Myers - Facilitators)  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 01, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    IRRI Breeders' Week Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 01, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Hybrid Rice ​R&D at IRRI


    by:

    ​​​Fangming Xie
    Senior Scientist​-Hybrid Rice R&D
    Plant Breeding



    Abstract:

    ​​​Hybrid rice is grown on about 20 million hectares annually in the world, with about 6 million ha in the countries outside of China. IRRI started the Hybrid Rice Development Consortium in 2008 to strengthen public and private partnership and support hybrid rice R&D at IRRI. What have we achieved so far and what challenges are seen ahead? Hybrid rice R&D at IRRI will be reviewed and future priorities will be discussed in this seminar. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, October 02, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    New Employee Orientation Program (Chris Croombes, Norm Macdonald - Facilitators)  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, October 02, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Safety Awareness Summit  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, October 05, 2015 08:30am - 09:30am
    Students from Laguna State University- Sta Cruz campus 40 pax
    standard program
    invite someone on Molecular breeding :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, October 06, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CORIGAP Planning Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, October 07, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    CORIGAP Planning Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 08, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Ecological Indicators and Field Calculator Training Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 08, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Transformational Innovations in Plant Breeding



    by:

    ​​​Peter Guzman
    Commercial Pipeline Breeder
    Monsanto Corn Research Station
    Harrisburg​, South Dakota​


    Abstract​

    ​Monsanto is a leading global provider of agricultural products for farmers, and our focus is on meeting their needs. Our goals are to help farmers double their yields in our core crops of corn, soybean, cotton, and canola, between 2000 and 2030, while using one-third fewer key resources, such as water and energy, for every bushel and bale they produce. In reaching those goals, we aim to improve lives by making farming more productive and efficient for growers around the world, including more than 5 million of them who, today, struggle to produce enough just to feed their families. In this seminar, I will describe how Monsanto is transforming plant breeding to deliver increased genetic gain through genetic diversity, enhanced breeding methods, automation, and analytics. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, October 09, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Ecological Indicators and Field Calculator Training Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 15, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    SUHAY Charity Book Sale  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 15, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar IRRI communication tools for information sharing and strategic engagement


    by:

    ​​​Antonio Joselito Lambino II
    Head, Communication




    ​Abstract:

    The daily information glut, fragmentation of communication channels, tyranny of the inbox, and densely linked global networks strain our ability to make sense and keep on top of everything. Taken together, these challenges demand harnessing tools and platforms for efficient and effective communication among internal and external stakeholders. Intuitive information access and strategic engagement have been key design drivers of IRRI communication’s trajectory. This session will feature the redesigned intranet (IRRI Hub), Rice Today online (ricetoday.irri.org), and other communication services, old and new, available to the IRRI community. ​ :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, October 16, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    Philrice's External Evaluation and Consultation Meetings  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, October 16, 2015 08:30am - 02:00pm
    Improving Rice Marketing and Linkages of Smallholders Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, October 20, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Special Seminar USAID/NASA joint initiative SERVIR-Mekong: a needs assessment of geospatial data and technologies in the Lower Mekong Region



    by:


    David J. Ganz
    Chief of Party, SERVIR-Mekong, a USAID- NASA Partnership
    Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC)


    ​Abstract:
    ​Rapid economic and population growth in the Lower Mekong Region (LMR; composed of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam) continue to drive changes in the region’s water regimes and the loss and degradation of natural vegetation and soils. These changes, in turn, are affecting, often negatively, ecosystem services, food and water security, and biodiversity. All of these impacts are exacerbated by climate change, further highlighting the need for improved governance and decision making in virtually all sectors.

    Geospatial data and technology can contribute significantly to more timely and informed decision making. For example, satellite radar-estimated rainfall can extend the early warning period for serious floods. However, in order to be useful in a given planning, policy, or other decision-making context, information must reach the right people and institutions at the right time and in the right form.

    SERVIR-Mekong, the latest addition to a USAID and NASA-initiated global network of hubs supporting the application of geospatial data and technologies for decision making, carried out a needs assessment in late 2014 and early 2015 to inform of the program’s strategic focus, as well as provide a resource for other stakeholders seeking to improve the effective application of geospatial data and technologies in the LMR. In this presentation, we review the needs expressed by a full range of country and regional stakeholders. Stakeholder-identified priorities for developing custom tools and applications included: mapping and monitoring land use and land cover, especially natural forests, plantation forests, and crops; monitoring and forecasting floods and droughts; measuring ecosystem services; forecasting crop yields; and facilitating basin-wide planning. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 22, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar CORIGAP: the exciting progress of a high profile IRRI consortium active in six Asian countries


    by:

    ​​​Grant Singleton
    Principal Scientist
    CESD​


    Abstract:
    The Vision of CORIGAP is to co-develop science-based tools to close yield gaps while protecting the environment, leading to improved production systems that boost the livelihoods of smallholder rice farmers and meet the increases in rice production required to maintain food security in Asia. The consortium focuses on lowland irrigated and favorable rainfed rice-based cropping systems. We work in major rice granaries in six Asian countries and have an extensive network of collaborating agencies.

    CORIGAP began in 2013 and the first phase ends in December 2016. In this seminar, I will provide a cross-section of the exciting science and partnerships in progress, drawn from our research on natural resource management of rice systems, postharvest management, and market chain analyses. The second 4-year phase of CORIGAP will begin in January 2017. Planning for Phase 2 has begun. I will report on the early progress and planned schedule for the development of this next phase.  :: IRRI Events

  • Sunday, October 25, 2015 - Friday, October 30, 2015 03:30am - 04:30am
    Sustainable Rice Platform 5th Annual Plenary Meeting and General Assembly contact person: Sarah Beebout :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, October 26, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    SRP Advisory Committee meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, October 26, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    IRRI Medical Clinic (IMC) Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, October 26, 2015 02:00pm - 03:00pm
    IRRI Medical Clinic (IMC) Information Session  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, October 27, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    SRP Annual Plenary Meeting and General Assembly  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, October 27, 2015 03:00pm - 05:00pm
    IRRI and UPLB Community Dialogue  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, October 27, 2015 07:00pm - 09:00pm
    Hail and Farewell Party  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, October 28, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    SRP Participants Tour at IRRI  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, October 29, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    SRP Annual Plenary Meeting and General Assembly  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, October 30, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    SRP Advisory Committee Meeting (+Secretariat)  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, October 30, 2015 01:00pm - 05:00pm
    Ganda Mo, Hanapbuhay Ko Graduation  :: IRRI Events

November, 2015
  • Tuesday, November 03, 2015 12:00pm - 02:00pm
    Farmers from Quezon 55 pax

    c/o Partnerships

    Museum
    LTCCE
    Hybridization (if there are standing crops)
    Drought, Salinity, Submergence (if there are standing crops)
    Wild Rice (can we add this?)
    Genebank
    Postharvest (Rei, Chris, can you accommodate these visits on November 3 and 10 in the afternoon?)
    Rice mill :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, November 05, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar : Dr. Buyung Hadi, Scientist - Entomology, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division Title: "Of pests and people: Designing pest-resilient rice ecosystem"

    ​Abstract:

    For farmers, insect pest incidence and outbreaks are often characterized by uncertainty and surprise. Because of this, many farmers choose the prophylactic application of insecticides as a way to prevent potential loss. The cheap price of insecticides encourages this behavior even more. However, the risks to humans and the environment due to insecticide misuse are not fully taken into consideration in this practice. An alternative framework for rice insect pest management is needed.

    Using IPM principles as the starting point, we propose pest-resilient rice ecosystem as an alternative framework. A pest-resilient rice ecosystem is characterized by the system’s capacity to absorb disturbances (e.g., insect pest populations) without compromising its processes and functions (e.g., producing yield). In this framework, priority is given to tactics that prevent the development of economically damaging levels of insect pest populations. Some examples are the deployment of resistant varieties, conservation of natural enemies, and the introduction of cultural practices that increase pest exposure toward natural enemies. In-depth investigation into insect ecology and behavior can yield insights to designing these tactics.

    Curative tactics should be selected and designed to minimize their potential of further upsetting the system’s pest resilience, with human and environmental safety in mind. Finally, farmers’ involvement in the whole design process is an imperative. In this seminar, Buyung will describe the Pest Ecology Group’s continuous attempt to identify and refine preventive and curative methods as building blocks of insect pest-resilient rice ecosystem. :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, November 09, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Writing Papers for Scientific Journals a training workshop by HRS :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, November 10, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Writing Papers for Scientific Journals a training workshop by HRS :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, November 10, 2015 12:00pm - 02:00pm
    Farmers from Quezon 55 pax

    c/o Partnerships

    Museum
    LTCCE
    Hybridization (if there are standing crops)
    Drought, Salinity, Submergence (if there are standing crops)
    Wild Rice (can we add this?)
    Genebank
    Postharvest (Rei, Chris, can you accommodate these visits on November 3 and 10 in the afternoon?)
    Rice mill :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, November 12, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    IRRI Seminar Series How long can rice seeds stay alive for?



    by:

    ​​
    ​Fiona Hay
    Senior Scientist-Genetic Resource Specialist​
    T.T. Chang Genetic Resources Center (TTCGRC​)​



    ​Abstract:

    Seed longevity is an important trait for anyone involved in storing and using seeds: farmers/growers, seed companies, breeders, or genebank managers.

    In this seminar, Dr Hay will present some of the theory around seed longevity, how we can make predictions depending on the initial quality of the seeds and the storage environment, and how this might be useful for genebank management.

    However, looking at the genebank’s routine viability monitoring data of seed lots of genebank accessions regenerated at IRRI between 1980 and 2002, it appears that the overall storage potential has declined since the early 1990s. The potential causes of this decline, including pre- and postharvest factors, which are known to influence seed quality, will be discussed.

    S​​o don't miss it!​
    ------------
    The IRRI seminar committee continues to encourage IRRI staff members to present seminars about their work. When preparing the PowerPoint for the seminar, staff members are encouraged to download and use the standard IRRI PowerPoint template. Also, shortly after most seminars have concluded, the audio file and PowerPoint file from the presentation will be available on a special Google Drive, accessible to staff at HQ and in the country offices.

    IRRI seminars are also a forum for invited guests to present information and their opinions on topics relevant to international rice research and the work of IRRI. Speakers at IRRI Seminars are guests of IRRI and we encourage you to welcome them in every way and engage in polite and constructive discussions with them.

    If you have a guest visiting from overseas, or know someone else, who you think would be a suitable candidate to give an IRRI seminar, please email the IRRI seminar committee chair, , to see if they can be fitted into the schedule. The IRRI seminar committee would like to channel all guest and special speakers into the IRRI seminars where possible and we will appreciate your help with this. :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, November 19, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Developing a gene interaction network associated with the adaptation of rice

    by:

    Dr Michael Purugganan
    Center for Genomics and Systems Biology
    New York University (NYU), USA
    and NYU-Abu Dhabi

    Abstract:

    Rice has evolved to adapt to various environments, including extreme conditions that trigger stress responses. These environmental responses are mediated by Environmentally-responsive Gene Regulatory Interaction Networks (eGRINs) that plants use to translate complex environmental information into coordinated metabolic responses. Here we present an inferred global eGRIN for the response of rice, based on transcriptome and chromatin accessibility data, as well as on knowledge of transcription factor binding motifs. This eGRIN integrates whole transcriptome measurements from five rice cultivars exposed to single-factor perturbation experiments and to agricultural field conditions. The development of such large-scale gene interaction networks, especially those that include field gene expression data, can help provide insights into rice plant responses in the field, understand how plants adapt to different agricultural settings, and possibly cope with environmental stresses associated with climate change. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, November 20, 2015 08:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar - DDGR position  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, November 20, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm
    Candidate Seminar - DDGR position  :: IRRI Events

  • Saturday, November 21, 2015 09:00am - 09:45am
    Candidate Seminar for the position of IRRI Myanmar Representative Speaker: Dr. Thomas Achilles :: IRRI Events

  • Saturday, November 21, 2015 09:45am - 10:30am
    Candidate Seminar for the position of IRRI Myanmar Representative Speaker Dr. Jongsoo Shin :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, November 23, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Country Office Representatives Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, November 24, 2015 08:00am - 12:00pm
    IP 101 Seminar  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, November 24, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Country Office Representatives Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, November 24, 2015 09:00am - 05:00pm
    Food Staples Sufficiency Program (FSSP) Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, November 25, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    Country Office Representatives Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, November 26, 2015 09:15am - 10:45am
    Candidate Seminar: Senior Scientist II - Plant Breeding and INGER-MET Coordinator  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, November 26, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar From the field to the molecular biology lab and back: application oriented basic science for development

    by:

    Ajay Kohli
    Senior Scientist
    Plant Breeding, Genetics and Biotechnology (PBGB)

    Abstract:

    Institutes with the mandate of impact on socio-economic development have largely been uncertain about the extent of involvement with upstream basic science. This is not least because most such institutes are at locations where cutting edge upstream tools and technologies are difficult to procure, standardize and vet. IRRI’s leadership in bringing field proven QTLs to be dissected in the molecular labs has been a game changing model for the relevance of molecular biology to downstream applications. Success at this end of the spectrum has provided the motivation to invest in molecular biology to be performed on relevant plants and populations that will have a much higher chance of success in the field. How the Plant Molecular Biology Lab at IRRI has had success at either end of the spectrum in the last 7 years will be elaborated in this seminar. It will close with a view on the role of some emerging technologies on the future of crop science research for development. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, November 27, 2015 09:15am - 10:45am
    Candidate Seminar: Senior Scientist II - Plant Breeding and INGER-MET Coordinator  :: IRRI Events

December, 2015
  • Tuesday, December 01, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GR Annual Team Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, December 01, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, December 01, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    CESD Seminar Digital rice plant architecture: measurement, reconstruction,
    traits extraction and application

    Xumeng Li
    Visiting Scientist at IRRI
    Associate Professor at
    HUNAN Agricultural University
    China


    Abstract. Characterization of geometric structure of rice canopy is challenging in structural-functional plant modeling. It informs on the design of plant-architecture ideotypes. This study developed a technique system for measurement, reconstruction and trait extraction of rice canopy architecture. Data collection was based on location-separation-measurement-method and on image analyses. Reconstruction of 3D digital architecture of rice canopy was done from the collected data. Virtual blade method was used to extract key traits of canopy architecture from the 3D digital architecture, such as leaf area, inclination and azimuth distribution in spatial coordinates. Several quantitative indexes were also developed to describe the plant compact degree. The influence of varieties, water and nitrogen management on the variability of these indexes was analysed and the correlation of eight structural indexes with biomass accumulation were modelled. :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, December 02, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GR Annual Team Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, December 02, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, December 03, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GR Annual Team Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, December 03, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, December 03, 2015 01:15pm - 02:15pm
    Thursday Seminar Prospects of breeding high-quality rice using post-genomic tools


    by:

    Nese Sreenivasulu
    Head
    Grain Quality and Nutrition Center (GQNC)

    Abstract:

    Acceptance of new rice genotypes by producers and consumers hinges not only on their potential for higher yield. Recent emphasis has also been on premium-value genotypes that have the ability to satisfy consumer preferences for grain quality. Advances in quality profiling and -omics technologies have provided efficient approaches to identify the key genes and biochemical markers involved in rice quality traits. Emphasis has been given to the holistic understanding of grain quality and attributes derived from sensory evaluation to leverage integrative gene discovery strategies that enable breeding programs to efficiently tap the huge genetic diversity in rice for novel genes that enhance its quality. An essential component to improve the efficiency of breeding operations is to integrate multi-tiered fingerprinting data (grain quality, sensory, and metabolome inferences) from diverse collections that differ in grain quality with the underpinning value of genetics and genomics to ensure the breeding of mega-varieties with superior grain quality and optimum yield. This holistic approach helps to (1) identify and measure the sensory attribute of interest, (2) relate quality indicators associated with the sensory attribute in a high-throughput manner, and (3) trace the metabolic pathways leading to grain quality associations. :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, December 04, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, December 04, 2015 05:30pm - 06:30pm
    Meeting with the CGIAR CRP c/o B.Bouman  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, December 07, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, December 07, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Manager - Research Infrastructure and Operations position  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, December 08, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, December 08, 2015 09:00am - 10:00am
    Candidate Seminar: Manager - Research Infrastructure and Operations position  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, December 09, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Thursday, December 10, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, December 11, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    GRiSP Proposal Writing Workshop  :: IRRI Events

  • Friday, December 11, 2015 11:00am - 01:30pm
    Turn Over Ceremony, Unveiling of the Marker and Ceremonial Tree Planting  :: IRRI Events

  • Monday, December 14, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    C4 Rice Annual Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Tuesday, December 15, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    C4 Rice Annual Meeting  :: IRRI Events

  • Wednesday, December 16, 2015 08:00am - 05:00pm
    C4 Rice Annual Meeting  :: IRRI Events