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Monday, October 09, 2017
Monday, October 09, 2017
  • 10:00am - 11:00am  Joint seminar of Agrifood Policy and Sustainable Impact Platforms Detecting rice crop and water management practices with remote sensing imagery. An overview of the research topics and fieldwork of three MSc students from ITC

    Andy Nelson
    Vidya Nahdhiyatul Fikriyah
    Sravan Shrestha
    Kuan Chai
    ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands

    Detecting rice crop and water management practices with remote sensing imagery. An overview of the research topics and fieldwork of three MSc students from ITC

    Vidya Nahdhiyatul Fikriyah1, Sravan Shrestha1, Kuan Chai1, Roshanak Darvishzadeh1, Alice Laborte2 and Andy Nelson1
    1 ITC - Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation of the University of Twente, Netherlands
    2 IRRI – International Rice Research Institute

    Remote sensing imagery is being used to map rice growing areas across several countries in Asia. This imagery, from both satellite and airborne platforms, can provide information on: area; establishment and harvesting dates; losses due to various calamities, and plant growth parameters as inputs to yield estimation models. While research on this continues, such information is already being delivered in pre-operational or operational systems in several countries, providing estimates of where, when and how much rice is grown for a given location and season.

    Once these essential characteristics of rice production have been provided to users, there are often requests to provide more nuanced information on how rice is grown, especially related to different crop and water management practices. On this basis, ITC, in collaboration with IRRI and the DA-PhilRice-IRRI Philippine Rice Information System (PRISM), has developed three MSc thesis topics to explore the use of remote sensing data to distinguish between:

    · Irrigated and rainfed rice.
    · Direct seeded or transplanted rice.
    · Different cropping intensities, such as single rice, double rice or rice grown with another crop.
    Three of the authors of the presentation are MSc students at ITC that have developed their MSc research questions and research methodologies around these topics.

    The presentation will first briefly introduce ITC and it’s unique role in research, education and capacity development in geo-spatial science. It will then give an overview of the three MSc topics and how the students will explore the capability of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) remote sensing imagery to detect different rice crop and water management practices. Finally it will give some impressions of the farmer surveys and basic field measurements conducted by the students in Central Luzon in Sep/Oct 2017. :: IRRI Events