What's happening at IRRI

Flat View
By Year
Monthly View
By Month
Weekly View
By Week
Daily View
Today
Jump to month
Jump to month
Search
Search

Daily View

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
  • 5th International Conference on Bacterial Blight Bacterial blight (BB) of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is considered the most important bacterial disease of rice due to its high epidemic potential, especially in extreme climate variation, and its destructiveness to high-yielding but susceptible cultivars. Despite attempts to control the disease by incorporating genetic resistance into high-yielding cultivars, the disease remains a major constraint to rice production in favorable and unfavorable rice environments throughout Asia. Its occurrence in the 1970s in Africa has added a new dimension to concerns about its dissemination.

    The International Conference on Bacterial Blight of Rice (ICBB) is held every three years--previously in Tsukuba (2004), Nanjing (2007), Seoul (2010), and Hyderabad (2013). Significant gains have been made in understanding BB through analysis of the interactions between Xoo and rice at many levels, including studies focused on the epidemiology, population biology, physiology, cell biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, and effectors involved in the rice-Xoo interaction. With recent advances in new tools and sequencing resources in rice and Xoo, tremendous knowledge has been generated in a shorter time frame. Thus, moving forward since the 4th ICBB, these advances and new innovations will be highlighted in the ICBB05 as we look into future strategies to manage this important disease.

    Event site: http://icbb05.irri.org :: IRRI Events

  • 01:30pm - 02:45pm  Seminar: SSD Rice Monitoring Surveys in South Asia: Progress-report 2014-2016


    Dr. Takashi Yamano
    Sr. Scientist – Impact Assessment Specialist
    Social Sciences Division


    Abstract
    Since 2014, large-scale farm surveys have been conducted under the Rice Monitoring Surveys in South Asia. Along the surveys, rice seed samples were collected from 20% of the sample farmers for DNA fingerprinting to identify varieties. The initial results from the DNA fingerprinting will be discussed in the seminar. Area estimates under rice varieties, including Swarna-Sub1 and BR11-Sub1, will be presented along with policy implications. :: IRRI Events